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Funerals

Enter here to explore ethical issues and discuss the meaning and source of morality.
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ranter
Posts: 139
Joined: July 4th, 2007, 9:20 pm

Funerals

#1 Post by ranter » November 2nd, 2019, 6:56 pm

Thoughts please and I’ll keep this one very brief.
I overhead a colleague saying that her husband ‘doesn’t do funerals’. WTF does that actually mean?
If I didn’t think it was decent and respectful to acknowledge the celebration of life as well as the passing of same, I’d probably ’ opt out' too.
Is it just an excuse to avoid thinking about our own mortality?
Ranter

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Alan H
Posts: 24046
Joined: July 3rd, 2007, 10:26 pm

Re: Funerals

#2 Post by Alan H » November 3rd, 2019, 12:19 am

A funeral is for the friends and relatives of the deceased. Some people may not want to be reminded of their mortality or they may not have liked the deceased or his/her friends and family - or he/she may just find them dreary and depressing. Or too religious. or not religious enough...

Each to his own.
Alan Henness

There are three fundamental questions for anyone advocating Brexit:

1. What, precisely, are the significant and tangible benefits of leaving the EU?
2. What damage to the UK and its citizens is an acceptable price to pay for those benefits?
3. Which ruling of the ECJ is most persuasive of the need to leave its jurisdiction?

ranter
Posts: 139
Joined: July 4th, 2007, 9:20 pm

Re: Funerals

#3 Post by ranter » November 3rd, 2019, 10:44 am

Point taken and a valid one too.
I should have mentioned that the husband who 'doesn't do funerals' was a very close, long standing friend of the man who died.
I, personally would never go to a funeral if I didn't like or respect the person who died, although I know many people who do.
Yes indeed, each to their own!
R

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