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In or out?

...on serious topics that don't fit anywhere else at present.
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Alan H
Posts: 23490
Joined: July 3rd, 2007, 10:26 pm

Re: In or out?

#3821 Postby Alan H » October 13th, 2018, 5:31 pm

Latest post of the previous page:

Brexit will be just fine. As long as you're not ill... Health department cannot guarantee 'supply of medicines' after Brexit, MPs warn
Vital drug shortages could become more likely when the UK quits the European Union, MPs are warning after health ministers were unable to give guarantees on how they would prevent fallout from a ”no deal” Brexit.

A report by the Public Accounts Committee (PAC) on medicines shortages last year found no evidence that the government was adequately prepared for similar disruption from leaving the EU.

The report said it was “worrying” that the Department “could not assure us of its plans to safeguard the supply of medicines after the UK has exited the European Union”.
Alan Henness

There are three fundamental questions for anyone advocating Brexit:

1. What, precisely, are the significant and tangible benefits of leaving the EU?
2. What damage to the UK and its citizens is an acceptable price to pay for those benefits?
3. Which ruling of the ECJ is most persuasive of the need to leave its jurisdiction?

User avatar
Alan H
Posts: 23490
Joined: July 3rd, 2007, 10:26 pm

Re: In or out?

#3822 Postby Alan H » October 13th, 2018, 11:38 pm

We're definitely going to run out of :popcorn: :popcorn: :popcorn: Exclusive: Tory Eurosceptics write open letter in major show of strength ahead of Brexit backstop decision
heresa May is attempting to placate a growing rebellion over her plans for Brexit as 63 Tory Eurosceptics issued a major new challenge to her authority and a Government aide said her proposals could cause Leave voters to “lose faith in our democracy”.

The Prime Minister’s advisers are attempting to craft new language for the Brexit withdrawal agreement amid signs the Cabinet will otherwise refuse to agree to her proposals for a “backstop” plan that would “temporarily” keep the UK in the EU’s customs union.

On Saturday night Brexiteer MPs sought to dispel claims by allies of Mrs May that they could be railroaded in the Commons with the help of rebel Labour votes.

In a highly unusual show of strength, a letter attacking the Government over its Brexit forecasts was signed by 63 Conservative MPs, including David Davis, the former Brexit secretary, Jacob Rees-Mogg, the chairman of the European Research Group of Eurosceptic backbenchers, and Steve Baker, the former Brexit minister.

Separately, writing in The Sunday Telegraph, Anne-Marie Trevelyan, a pro-Leave MP who is parliamentary private secretary at the Department for Education, said remaining in a “temporary customs arrangement” after the end of the transition period in December 2020 “means simply delaying Brexit and causing the 17.4 million people who voted for it to lose faith in our democracy, and in our democratic and legal institutions”.
Alan Henness

There are three fundamental questions for anyone advocating Brexit:

1. What, precisely, are the significant and tangible benefits of leaving the EU?
2. What damage to the UK and its citizens is an acceptable price to pay for those benefits?
3. Which ruling of the ECJ is most persuasive of the need to leave its jurisdiction?

User avatar
Alan H
Posts: 23490
Joined: July 3rd, 2007, 10:26 pm

Re: In or out?

#3823 Postby Alan H » October 15th, 2018, 8:22 pm

This Brexit thingy is all going tickety-boo, isn't it? AstraZeneca halts UK investments due to Brexit uncertainties
Pharmaceutical giant AstraZeneca has suspended investments in Britain due to the lack of clarity over the country's departure from the European Union.

With less than six months to go, Leif Johansson, non-executive chairman, told France's Le Monde newspaper precautions had to be taken.

"If a transition deal does not make clear what will happen in the future, we will maintain our decision not to invest," Mr Johansson said.

"A Brexit agreement will need to ensure that Britain does not become an isolated island in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean."

Providing the certainty and stability businesses need...
Alan Henness

There are three fundamental questions for anyone advocating Brexit:

1. What, precisely, are the significant and tangible benefits of leaving the EU?
2. What damage to the UK and its citizens is an acceptable price to pay for those benefits?
3. Which ruling of the ECJ is most persuasive of the need to leave its jurisdiction?


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