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This humanist chaplain sounds right

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coffee
Posts: 1594
Joined: June 2nd, 2009, 4:53 pm

This humanist chaplain sounds right

#1 Post by coffee » September 10th, 2016, 4:30 pm

Humanist Chaplain guides non-religious USC students

http://dailytrojan.com/2016/09/07/human ... -students/

Zeff
Posts: 142
Joined: August 6th, 2016, 2:13 pm

Re: This humanist chaplain sounds right

#2 Post by Zeff » September 11th, 2016, 3:42 pm

I agree with this "..create a positive community.." but of people, whether religious or not.

But I disagree with "but that I’m still a religious leader". That statement might be seen to validate the idea that religion and morality are linked.

Humanist (upper case H), atheist, skeptic and freethinking groups are failing to compete with religious cults in two areas where thinking needs to change. One is what might be termed 'pastoral care' and the other regards inclusiveness.

Regarding pastoral care: I think humanist groups should try to provide a trained guidance counsellor who is available for hospital visits and the community at large. For instance, the local volunteers in my area say that lonliness is a problem these days. Lonely people are generally catered for if they are old, young, infirm, disabled or have mental health issues but there is a gap for those aged 25 to 55. A trained humanist counsellor could help there.

Regarding inclusiveness: I would point to the fact that humanist groups in NI and Scotland are divided into two or three societies and some of them hardly seem on very good speaking terms really, much less closely cooperating and well coordinated. And then there's the Skeptics and Secular Society members who 'don't like' Humanist groups. In response to that humanist groups should discuss the success of the Quaker model of a 'society of friends'. In the UK, most Quaker groups are quite welcoming to non-believers who can become full members of the society and don't see it as a religion. As a result, all are welcome at the society of friends, including the superstitious and those opposed to the idea of religious faith. It is that sort of flexibility of thought and accommodation of dissenting views that should be the aim of all Humanist groups if they wish to be seen as humanist (lower case).

coffee
Posts: 1594
Joined: June 2nd, 2009, 4:53 pm

Re: This humanist chaplain sounds right

#3 Post by coffee » September 11th, 2016, 8:29 pm

Sound good Zeff

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Wonky Donkey
Posts: 17
Joined: September 1st, 2016, 10:32 am

Re: This humanist chaplain sounds right

#4 Post by Wonky Donkey » September 18th, 2016, 9:24 am

Zeff wrote:I agree with this "..create a positive community.." but of people, whether religious or not.

But I disagree with "but that I’m still a religious leader". That statement might be seen to validate the idea that religion and morality are linked.

Humanist (upper case H), atheist, skeptic and freethinking groups are failing to compete with religious cults in two areas where thinking needs to change. One is what might be termed 'pastoral care' and the other regards inclusiveness.

Regarding pastoral care: I think humanist groups should try to provide a trained guidance counsellor who is available for hospital visits and the community at large. For instance, the local volunteers in my area say that lonliness is a problem these days. Lonely people are generally catered for if they are old, young, infirm, disabled or have mental health issues but there is a gap for those aged 25 to 55. A trained humanist counsellor could help there.

Regarding inclusiveness: I would point to the fact that humanist groups in NI and Scotland are divided into two or three societies and some of them hardly seem on very good speaking terms really, much less closely cooperating and well coordinated. And then there's the Skeptics and Secular Society members who 'don't like' Humanist groups. In response to that humanist groups should discuss the success of the Quaker model of a 'society of friends'. In the UK, most Quaker groups are quite welcoming to non-believers who can become full members of the society and don't see it as a religion. As a result, all are welcome at the society of friends, including the superstitious and those opposed to the idea of religious faith. It is that sort of flexibility of thought and accommodation of dissenting views that should be the aim of all Humanist groups if they wish to be seen as humanist (lower case).
Very interesting and informative.
With kindness,

The Wonkiest Donkey in England

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