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A Humanist Calendar

Any topics that are primarily about humanism or other non-religious life stances fit in here.
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Maria Mac
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#21 Post by Maria Mac » September 27th, 2007, 10:24 am

Latest post of the previous page:

Alan H wrote:Turnips are the yellow ones and swedes are white.
No, actually it's the other way round. I was in Tesco's in Shettleston yesterday and bought both. The items they'd labelled swedes were yellow the neeps were white.

Fred
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Joined: July 13th, 2007, 3:33 pm

#22 Post by Fred » September 27th, 2007, 11:34 am

in cornwall, what the english call swedes we called turnips, what the english called turnips, we called cattle feed.
Fred

lewist
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#23 Post by lewist » September 27th, 2007, 1:31 pm

I suspect in Scotland we call them all neeps. I once looked at the ingredient list for a certain well known brand of pickle. Up there at the top and therefore q main ingredient was the exotic vegetable rutabaga. Well guess what that turned out to be when I looked it up!

The objectionable trick or treat was, I think, introduced by American Television programmes, especially The Simpsons.
Carpe diem. Savour every moment.

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Alan C.
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#24 Post by Alan C. » September 27th, 2007, 2:22 pm

I've said this before (at the old place) but I'll say it again for all the new folk.
Anybody further north than us on the mainland (Shetland mainland) and everybody on the Islands of Yell, Unst, and Foula, still celebrate Xmas on the 6th January (Auld Yule) I've posted a short poem abut it in the poetry thread.
Abstinence Makes the Church Grow Fondlers.

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gcb01
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#25 Post by gcb01 » September 27th, 2007, 3:52 pm

I'd heard you lot were a bit behind the times but that's taking it too far!
Regards

Campbell

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Alan C.
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#26 Post by Alan C. » September 27th, 2007, 4:02 pm

gcb01 wrote:I'd heard you lot were a bit behind the times but that's taking it too far!
:laughter: It's great for us, (although we don't celebrate it AS Xmas) we're kinda on the border if you like so our village has Xmas on 25th December, then a couple of weeks later, just after getting over Hogmanay, we can share Xmas again with the next village up the road. :party:
Abstinence Makes the Church Grow Fondlers.

lewist
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Joined: July 4th, 2007, 8:53 pm

#27 Post by lewist » September 27th, 2007, 7:55 pm

And do you then celebrate Up Helly Aa?

Perhaps we need to see the entire Shetlanders calendar, Alan,and we can all consider moving to join you! :laughter:
Carpe diem. Savour every moment.

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Alan C.
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#28 Post by Alan C. » September 27th, 2007, 8:06 pm

Lewist
And do you then celebrate Up Helly Aa?
EVERYBODY celebrates Up-Helly-Aa, it's the biggest holiday in Shetland, apart from some shops and essential services, the whole place shuts down for two days. Yes there's some serious partying/boozing crammed into the four weeks from 25/12 till the third Tuesday in January.
Abstinence Makes the Church Grow Fondlers.

Beki
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Joined: July 5th, 2007, 8:43 am

#29 Post by Beki » September 27th, 2007, 8:16 pm

My mum went up to Shetland to visit friends last Up-Helly-Aa and said it was fantastic, but she has no idea how you guys manage the pace - she had never seen such quantities being put away!!!

I was at the Scotland v Lithuania game at Hampden a wee while ago and I loved the slogan on a shirt that I saw.

"Shetland Island Scotland Supporters Club - Every Game is an Away Game".

Not Half!! Now that is some committment.... :thumbsup:



PS I think neeps are yellow. I am not sure what those little white things are that they sell in Tesco and call 'turnips' but I am sure that they are just as difficult to hollow out into Halloween lanterns though!

Beki
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Joined: July 5th, 2007, 8:43 am

#30 Post by Beki » September 27th, 2007, 8:34 pm

Back on topic, I think that (especially in Scotland), more should be made of David Hume as one of the most important philosophers of the Enlightenment. I am in no way an expert, but the little that I have heard and read makes me think that we should have better knowledge of his work and thinkings. For example this extract in Wikipedia:

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The design argument
One of the oldest and most popular arguments for the existence of God is the design argument – that all the order and 'purpose' in the world bespeaks a divine origin. A modern manifestation of this belief is creationism. Hume gave the classic criticism of the design argument in Dialogues concerning Natural Religion and An Enquiry concerning Human Understanding. Here are some of his points:

For the design argument to be feasible, it must be true that order and purpose are observed only when they result from design. But order is observed regularly, resulting from presumably mindless processes like snowflake or crystal generation. Design accounts for only a tiny part of our experience with order and "purpose".

Furthermore, the design argument is based on an incomplete analogy: because of our experience with objects, we can recognise human-designed ones, comparing for example a pile of stones and a brick wall. But in order to point to a designed Universe, we would need to have an experience of a range of different universes. As we only experience one, the analogy cannot be applied. We must ask therefore if it is right to why we ought to compare the world to a machine — as in Paley's watchmaker argument — when perhaps it would be better described as a giant inert animal.

Even if the design argument is completely successful, it could not (in and of itself) establish a robust theism; one could easily reach the conclusion that the universe's configuration is the result of some morally ambiguous, possibly unintelligent agent or agents whose method bears only a remote similarity to human design. In this way it could be asked if the designer was God, or further still, who designed the designer?

If a well-ordered natural world requires a special designer, then God's mind (being so well-ordered) also requires a special designer. And then this designer would likewise need a designer, and so on ad infinitum. We could respond by resting content with an inexplicably self-ordered divine mind but then why not rest content with an inexplicably self-ordered natural world?

Often, what appears to be purpose, where it looks like object X has feature F in order to secure some outcome O, is better explained by a filtering process: that is, object X wouldn't be around did it not possess feature F, and outcome O is only interesting to us as a human projection of goals onto nature. This mechanical explanation of teleology anticipated natural selection. (see also Anthropic principle)

The design argument does not explain pain, suffering, and natural disasters.

******************
Now - where have I read this kind of thing recently Mr Dawkins? :wink:

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