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Tin Tin

Enter here to talk about books, art, literature, film, TV and anything else to do with popular culture.
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kbell
Posts: 1146
Joined: July 3rd, 2007, 11:27 pm

Tin Tin

#1 Post by kbell » July 22nd, 2007, 2:20 am

Was anybody here a big fan of Tin Tin?

Are the books racist?

I've no idea.

Nick
Posts: 11027
Joined: July 4th, 2007, 10:10 am

#2 Post by Nick » July 22nd, 2007, 12:32 pm

I dont know about Tin Tin, but when I was little I ws very fond of Little Black Sambo. I'm sure that would be deemed utterly racist now, though I can't remember the story, but I was very fond of the lad which I think was a good thing.

kbell
Posts: 1146
Joined: July 3rd, 2007, 11:27 pm

#3 Post by kbell » July 22nd, 2007, 6:12 pm

From Wiki:
In mid-July 2007, the UK's equal rights body, the Commission for Racial Equality called on highstreet shops to pull the book from the shelves after a complaint by David Enright, a human rights lawyer who came across the book in the children's section of highstreet chain Borders whilst shopping with his African wife and two sons. The store later moved the book from the children's section to the area reserved for adult graphic novels.
I never read the books but vaguely remember seeing it on TV and I think it did portray 'natives' in a stereotypical one-dimensional way. It was written in the 20s and reflected the view of the time. I don't think it should be stocked in the children's section - I mean what parent of the 21st century would want to buy their child Tintin in the Congo, anyway?

I think if David Enright judges it racist and the CRE agrees, then it probably is and it should be sold in the adult section as a collectors item along with all the other quaint claptrap of the era.

It will be interesting to see what Steven Speilberg makes of it.

Titanium Wheels
Posts: 143
Joined: July 4th, 2007, 8:20 am

#4 Post by Titanium Wheels » July 22nd, 2007, 6:22 pm

I seem to remember quite a few books that probably could not be put on shelves these days. I mean, look at the Noddy books. There is a whole town of Gollies, had a longer name in my day which, with their black faces would not do. Then Noddy and Big Ears going to bed together.... I am astonished I am so little harmed by these stories.

Best off reading the Rev Audrey railway Stories of Thomas and the other engines. At least they are moral in their outloo and have no dubious material.
Wheelchair-Rollin' Househusband

Maria Mac
Site Admin
Posts: 9302
Joined: July 3rd, 2007, 10:34 pm

#5 Post by Maria Mac » July 22nd, 2007, 7:53 pm

Titanium Wheels wrote:
Best off reading the Rev Audrey railway Stories of Thomas and the other engines. At least they are moral in their outloo and have no dubious material.
But aren't they a bit sexist? I mean, not many positive role models for..um female trains. :wink:

As for Little Black Sambo, that is how the headmaster of my primary school used to address the black and Asian kids (maybe 5% of the school roll in the early 1960s). He seemed to have no problem remembering the names of us white kids but black kids he'd just call 'Sambo', if there was just one child, or 'little black sambos' for two or more.

Of course, it never occurred to anyone that there was anything wrong with this.

:shock:

para handy
Posts: 587
Joined: July 3rd, 2007, 10:39 pm

#6 Post by para handy » July 22nd, 2007, 9:00 pm

A thirty second video that gives a taste of Tin Tin. Warning: contains strong language.

Tin Tin's narrow escape

Bryn
Posts: 665
Joined: July 3rd, 2007, 10:47 pm

#7 Post by Bryn » July 24th, 2007, 12:25 am

Ha Ha Ha - that's hilarious!

:hilarity:


I agree with the view that these stories are unsuitable because they are racist and colonialist. They're not for today's kids.

Nick
Posts: 11027
Joined: July 4th, 2007, 10:10 am

#8 Post by Nick » July 24th, 2007, 10:01 am

Re: Thomas The Tank Engine: Isn't there a time for boys to be boys without sissy girls getting in the way? If a book is written for girls, boys are unlikely to complain that they are excluded, or are they? IMO, the most important thing for a book to do is encourage the kid to read.

In a previous life, my then partner was a very 'right-on' lady, who was determined her son would not grow up to be sexist, and amongst other things, as a baby, made sure he had a doll to play with as well as other toys. However, her son had other ideas: his first word was 'car' and his second was 'truck'. C'est la vie!

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