INFORMATION

This website uses cookies to store information on your computer. Some of these cookies are essential to make our site work and others help us to improve by giving us some insight into how the site is being used. For further information, see our Privacy Policy. Continuing to use this website is acceptance of these cookies.

Grammer and phrases wot is irritating

General socialising and light-hearted discussions take place in here.
Post Reply
Message
Author
Nick
Posts: 11027
Joined: July 4th, 2007, 10:10 am

Re: Grammer and phrases wot is irritating

#121 Post by Nick » February 9th, 2012, 4:15 pm

Latest post of the previous page:

animist wrote:I'll duck the last comment...

..well, ducks do have webbed feet.... :D



Back at school, we had a retired Colonel, so ramrod straight, he was alleged to have webbed armpits...... Dunno what the evolutionary advantage of that might be....

User avatar
Dave B
Posts: 17809
Joined: May 17th, 2010, 9:15 pm

Re: Grammer and phrases wot is irritating

#122 Post by Dave B » February 9th, 2012, 4:30 pm

he was alleged to have webbed armpits...... Dunno what the evolutionary advantage of that might be.
Perhaps he was evolving into a flying squirrel?
Image
"Look forward; yesterday was a lesson, if you did not learn from it you wasted it."
Me, 2015

Nick
Posts: 11027
Joined: July 4th, 2007, 10:10 am

Re: Grammer and phrases wot is irritating

#123 Post by Nick » February 9th, 2012, 5:51 pm

The resemblance is uncanny! :laughter:


Whoever knew that squirrels would be evolutionarily predisposed to teaching physics?

User avatar
Dave B
Posts: 17809
Joined: May 17th, 2010, 9:15 pm

Re: Grammer and phrases wot is irritating

#124 Post by Dave B » February 9th, 2012, 7:36 pm

Looking for something else I have just discovered a punctuation symbol I have long felt a need for - the interobang, the combined exclamation and question mark.
But you have to put it into a Word doc then copy and paste it for here.

Is that not a useful character
"Look forward; yesterday was a lesson, if you did not learn from it you wasted it."
Me, 2015

User avatar
Alan H
Posts: 24062
Joined: July 3rd, 2007, 10:26 pm

Re: Grammer and phrases wot is irritating

#125 Post by Alan H » February 9th, 2012, 7:43 pm

Dave B wrote:Is that not a useful character
I wish English had the equivalent of the French 'Si'.
Alan Henness

There are three fundamental questions for anyone advocating Brexit:

1. What, precisely, are the significant and tangible benefits of leaving the EU?
2. What damage to the UK and its citizens is an acceptable price to pay for those benefits?
3. Which ruling of the ECJ is most persuasive of the need to leave its jurisdiction?

User avatar
Dave B
Posts: 17809
Joined: May 17th, 2010, 9:15 pm

Re: Grammer and phrases wot is irritating

#126 Post by Dave B » February 9th, 2012, 7:54 pm

Alan H wrote:
Dave B wrote:Is that not a useful character
I wish English had the equivalent of the French 'Si'.
Not met that one, Alan, and can't find it on the net.

What is it?

Later: Ah, found something about "if-then".
"Look forward; yesterday was a lesson, if you did not learn from it you wasted it."
Me, 2015

User avatar
Alan H
Posts: 24062
Joined: July 3rd, 2007, 10:26 pm

Re: Grammer and phrases wot is irritating

#127 Post by Alan H » February 9th, 2012, 11:46 pm

Dave B wrote:
Alan H wrote:
Dave B wrote:Is that not a useful character
I wish English had the equivalent of the French 'Si'.
Not met that one, Alan, and can't find it on the net.

What is it?

Later: Ah, found something about "if-then".
It can mean 'if' (Si j'ai froid... If I am cold...), but it's also an affirmative response to a negative question. In English, if we try to answer "Is that not a useful character‽", it's difficult to answer it yes or no without uncertainty about whether you are agreeing or disagreeing that it's a useful character. Answering 'Si' is saying yes, it is a useful character, unambiguously.
Alan Henness

There are three fundamental questions for anyone advocating Brexit:

1. What, precisely, are the significant and tangible benefits of leaving the EU?
2. What damage to the UK and its citizens is an acceptable price to pay for those benefits?
3. Which ruling of the ECJ is most persuasive of the need to leave its jurisdiction?

User avatar
jaywhat
Posts: 15807
Joined: July 5th, 2007, 5:53 pm

Re: Grammer and phrases wot is irritating

#128 Post by jaywhat » February 10th, 2012, 5:55 am

And when exactly could you use it

Nick
Posts: 11027
Joined: July 4th, 2007, 10:10 am

Re: Grammer and phrases wot is irritating

#129 Post by Nick » February 10th, 2012, 11:08 am

Have you noticed how often people answer a question with "Yes, no, blah blah blah...."

What's that "yes, no" all about? Probably a stalling mechanism while they think.

User avatar
Dave B
Posts: 17809
Joined: May 17th, 2010, 9:15 pm

Re: Grammer and phrases wot is irritating

#130 Post by Dave B » February 10th, 2012, 4:12 pm

Probably a stalling mechanism while they think.
Think?
"Look forward; yesterday was a lesson, if you did not learn from it you wasted it."
Me, 2015

stevenw888
Posts: 694
Joined: July 16th, 2010, 12:48 pm

Re: Grammer and phrases wot is irritating

#131 Post by stevenw888 » February 23rd, 2012, 1:42 pm

An Ode to English Plurals

We'll begin with a box, and the plural is boxes,
But the plural of ox becomes oxen, not oxes.
One fowl is a goose, but two are called geese,
Yet the plural of moose should never be meese.
You may find a lone mouse or a nest full of mice,
Yet the plural of house is houses, not hice.

If the plural of man is always called men,
Why shouldn't the plural of pan be called pen?
If I speak of my foot and show you my feet,
And I give you a boot, would a pair be called beet?
If one is a tooth and a whole set are teeth,
Why shouldn't the plural of booth be called beeth?

Then one may be that, and three would be those,
Yet hat in the plural would never be hose,
And the plural of cat is cats, not cose.
We speak of a brother and also of brethren,
But though we say mother, we never say methren.
Then the masculine pronouns are he, his and him,
But imagine the feminine: she, shis and shim!

Let's face it - English is a crazy language.
There is no egg in eggplant nor ham in hamburger;
neither apple nor pine in pineapple.
English muffins weren't invented in England .
We take English for granted, but if we explore its paradoxes,
we find that quicksand can work slowly, boxing rings are square,
and a guinea pig is neither from Guinea nor is it a pig.

And why is it that writers write but fingers don't fing,
grocers don't groce and hammers don't ham?
Doesn't it seem crazy that you can make amends but not one amend.
If you have a bunch of odds and ends and
get rid of all but one of them, what do you call it?

If teachers taught, why didn't preachers praught?
If a vegetarian eats vegetables, what does a humanitarian eat?
Sometimes I think all the folks who grew up speaking English
should be committed to an asylum for the verbally insane.

In what other language do people recite at a play and play at a recital?
We ship by truck but send cargo by ship.
We have noses that run and feet that smell.
We park in a driveway and drive in a parkway.
And how can a slim chance and a fat chance be the same,
while a wise man and a wise guy are opposites?

You have to marvel at the unique lunacy of a language
in which your house can burn up as it burns down,
in which you fill in a form by filling it out, and
in which an alarm goes off by going on.

And in closing, if Father is Pop, how come Mother's not Mop?
"There are old pilots and there are bold pilots, but there are no old, bold pilots." - From the film "Top Gun"

User avatar
Val
Posts: 749
Joined: October 6th, 2007, 10:56 pm

Re: Grammer and phrases wot is irritating

#132 Post by Val » February 23rd, 2012, 1:48 pm

Thanks Steven for a good laugh.

User avatar
Dave B
Posts: 17809
Joined: May 17th, 2010, 9:15 pm

Re: Grammer and phrases wot is irritating

#133 Post by Dave B » February 23rd, 2012, 1:55 pm

Street talk: ". . . so he says he has no money on him so I'm like, "Got a cheque book?" ennit(?)(!)(.) Muppet!""

This is a thirty something chap in a smart suit, very shiny shoes, with a leather briefcase (no, not a laptop case). Not sure if the "ennit" is a question, "punctuation" or a statement.

I know I have heard it before but am now wondering when, "I'm like," replaced, "I said." Was there a, "I said . . . ., like," stage one might wonder.
"Look forward; yesterday was a lesson, if you did not learn from it you wasted it."
Me, 2015

User avatar
Dave B
Posts: 17809
Joined: May 17th, 2010, 9:15 pm

Re: Grammer and phrases wot is irritating

#134 Post by Dave B » February 23rd, 2012, 1:57 pm

I think I have a version of that poem somewhere, Steve, but thanks - I will add that o my collection anyway.

A friend who teaches EFL finds these useful.
"Look forward; yesterday was a lesson, if you did not learn from it you wasted it."
Me, 2015

User avatar
Tetenterre
Posts: 3244
Joined: March 13th, 2011, 11:36 am

Re: Grammer and phrases wot is irritating

#135 Post by Tetenterre » February 23rd, 2012, 2:52 pm

Some more for your EFL-teaching friend, Dave:
http://www.spellingsociety.org/news/media/poems.php
Steve

Quantum Theory: The branch of science with which people who know absolutely sod all about quantum theory can explain anything.

User avatar
Dave B
Posts: 17809
Joined: May 17th, 2010, 9:15 pm

Re: Grammer and phrases wot is irritating

#136 Post by Dave B » February 23rd, 2012, 3:33 pm

Thanks, TT.

I have some of those, or close variations, but there are new ones there for the collection!
"Look forward; yesterday was a lesson, if you did not learn from it you wasted it."
Me, 2015

User avatar
getreal
Posts: 4354
Joined: November 20th, 2008, 5:40 pm

Re: Grammer and phrases wot is irritating

#137 Post by getreal » February 24th, 2012, 11:33 pm

I hate to hear sentences end with a preposition (though I'll admit that sometimes I do it, too). A wee joke I posted before

Harvard educated man road tripping accross the US, drops into a bar in redneck country. Standing at the bar is a local
Spoiler:
"Where you from?" asks the local man
"I'm from somewhere where they don't end sentences with a preposition" Harvard man replies, snootily
"All right then" replies the redneck "where you from asshole?"
"It's hard to put a leash on a dog once you've put a crown on his head"-Tyrion Lannister.

User avatar
Alan H
Posts: 24062
Joined: July 3rd, 2007, 10:26 pm

Re: Grammer and phrases wot is irritating

#138 Post by Alan H » February 25th, 2012, 12:31 am

Somebody Tweeted this today, saying:
If you call your business Apostrophe then you probably shouldn't do this:

Image
Alan Henness

There are three fundamental questions for anyone advocating Brexit:

1. What, precisely, are the significant and tangible benefits of leaving the EU?
2. What damage to the UK and its citizens is an acceptable price to pay for those benefits?
3. Which ruling of the ECJ is most persuasive of the need to leave its jurisdiction?

User avatar
Emma Woolgatherer
Posts: 2976
Joined: February 27th, 2008, 12:17 pm

Re: Grammer and phrases wot is irritating

#139 Post by Emma Woolgatherer » February 25th, 2012, 1:13 am

:pointlaugh:



Something I'm finding irritating at the moment because it has become so commonplace and acceptable now: using the word "swathe" or "swathes" to mean "a lot of" or "a large proportion of", as in "Vast swathes of people will benefit from tax cuts next month" (PoliticsHome) or "Goverment planning to privatise swathes of NHS, claim GPs" (Telegraph) or "Swathes of Britain left with no local bank" (This Is Money) or "[T]he International Union for Conservation of Nature ... has added a swathe of animals and plants to its Red List of Threatened Species" (New Scientist) or "The people who wrecked swathes of property, burned vehicles and terrorised communities have no moral compass to make them susceptible to guilt or shame" (Daily Mail).

A swathe is a bandage, or a strip of material. A swath is a strip of mown grass or grain, or a strip of land. Over the years, the distinction has been lost, which is a shame, I think, because I love the word "swath". And I'm glad that the Guardian, at least, still uses it properly, as in "Liam Fox backs plan to cut swath through armed forces' top ranks". But if swathe were simply used in place of swath, to refer to a strip of land, you might just get away with things like "Arlene to drench wide swathes of central Mexico" (Reuters). The use of "wide" at least suggests some awareness of the strip-like nature of the swath(e). But swathes of people? Swathes of animals and plants? Ooh, how it grates.

User avatar
Dave B
Posts: 17809
Joined: May 17th, 2010, 9:15 pm

Re: Grammer and phrases wot is irritating

#140 Post by Dave B » February 25th, 2012, 6:58 am

getreal wrote:I hate to hear sentences end with a preposition (though I'll admit that sometimes I do it, too). A wee joke I posted before

Harvard educated man road tripping accross the US, drops into a bar in redneck country. Standing at the bar is a local
Spoiler:
"Where you from?" asks the local man
"I'm from somewhere where they don't end sentences with a preposition" Harvard man replies, snootily
"All right then" replies the redneck "where you from asshole?"
Must be too early for me. How should you rephrase, "Where are you from" to elicit the place of origin of the person without using three or four extra words or, as is the practice in some languages, posing such a question as, "From where you are?" :D

There are times when I am glad that I never had much education in formal English grammar - the reason for many of the rules appears to be lost in the mists of the past.
"Look forward; yesterday was a lesson, if you did not learn from it you wasted it."
Me, 2015

User avatar
animist
Posts: 6521
Joined: July 30th, 2010, 11:36 pm

Re: Grammer and phrases wot is irritating

#141 Post by animist » February 25th, 2012, 8:00 am

Dave B wrote:
getreal wrote:I hate to hear sentences end with a preposition (though I'll admit that sometimes I do it, too). A wee joke I posted before

Harvard educated man road tripping accross the US, drops into a bar in redneck country. Standing at the bar is a local
Spoiler:
"Where you from?" asks the local man
"I'm from somewhere where they don't end sentences with a preposition" Harvard man replies, snootily
"All right then" replies the redneck "where you from asshole?"
Must be too early for me. How should you rephrase, "Where are you from" to elicit the place of origin of the person without using three or four extra words or, as is the practice in some languages, posing such a question as, "From where you are?" :D

There are times when I am glad that I never had much education in formal English grammar - the reason for many of the rules appears to be lost in the mists of the past.
actually, in this case, you could avoid the preposition entirely by saying "whence are you?"

Post Reply