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Earliest Quran?

For topics that are more about faith, religion and religious organisations than anything else.
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getreal
Posts: 4354
Joined: November 20th, 2008, 5:40 pm

Re: Earliest Quran?

#21 Post by getreal » May 24th, 2016, 10:03 am

Latest post of the previous page:

I think for the vast majority of Christians, and the main Christian sects, the bible isn't the literal word of God. As far as I understand Islam, though, the Basis of their belief is that the Koran is the actual word of God. Therefore you cannot pick and choose,mwhere as Christians in the main believe the bible to be an interpretation, by humans, of events. That's the difference.
"It's hard to put a leash on a dog once you've put a crown on his head"-Tyrion Lannister.

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Dave B
Posts: 17809
Joined: May 17th, 2010, 9:15 pm

Re: Earliest Quran?

#22 Post by Dave B » May 24th, 2016, 10:38 am

getreal wrote:I think for the vast majority of Christians, and the main Christian sects, the bible isn't the literal word of God. As far as I understand Islam, though, the Basis of their belief is that the Koran is the actual word of God. Therefore you cannot pick and choose,mwhere as Christians in the main believe the bible to be an interpretation, by humans, of events. That's the difference.
I also get the impression that you cannot choose which bits of the Quran you want and ignore others.

However one learned Muslim theologician did say that the interpretation of what the Quran says is up to the reader, there is no authorative commentary. Thus there can effectively be as many versions of the Quran as there are Muslims. Like the Bible it could all be allegory and metaphor - but take either literally when they involve destroying all enemies, i.e. non-Muslims, and there is blood everywhere. One can "destroy" an enemy by making peace and creating a friend. But chopping his head of is a quicker solution.

Unfortunately the tone of that interpretation can be impressed on young minds, as in madrasas.
"Look forward; yesterday was a lesson, if you did not learn from it you wasted it."
Me, 2015

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