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Religious discrimination in RC schools

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Alan H
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Religious discrimination in RC schools

#1 Post by Alan H » July 21st, 2007, 10:00 pm

I came across this Glasgow Council document that states, after the David McNab case, the rules that forces the Council to discriminate on the grounds of religion on behalf of the RC Church.

Nothing like getting someone else to do your dirty work for you!

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Alan C.
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#2 Post by Alan C. » July 21st, 2007, 10:33 pm

Paragraph 2 states,
Seeking Roman Catholic Approval
Roman Catholic approval..............to work with bairns........Priceless.
The Catholic church is just sooooooooo scared of losing the lambs, before they've been fleeced, it would be laughable if not so serious.
Abstinence Makes the Church Grow Fondlers.

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Lifelinking
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#3 Post by Lifelinking » July 21st, 2007, 11:33 pm

From the Scottish Catholic Education Service
http://www.sces.uk.com/teaching/approval.asp
You must provide the name of a suitable referee who can testify as to your commitment to the Catholic school. You should select someone who knows you in a professional capacity or who can comment authoritatively on your "religious belief and character" .

If you are Catholic, you should provide the name of a priest referee (normally your parish priest) who knows you and can testify to your ability to witness to faith.
I know I am probably being unfair, but I cannot help but wonder how many prospective teachers the despicable Father Gerry Nugent acted as a referee for http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/scotland/gla ... 634253.stm


:angry:
"Who thinks the law has anything to do with justice? It's what we have because we can't have justice."
William McIlvanney

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Alan C.
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#4 Post by Alan C. » July 22nd, 2007, 12:17 am

The judge said he would have imposed a jail sentence but he took into account the priest's history of helping others.
I have strived my whole life to help others, and to do the best I can for humanity and the planet in general.
My wife has told me, in discussions we have had, that if ever she was suffering with a terminal illness, and was in pain, that she would want me to help her end it.
I don't know if I could, and have told her this, but if I did you can bet your bottom dollar I would get a prison sentence for it.
Where is the justice in this? If I said my religion dictated that I shouldn't let her suffer, would that be acceptable? probably yes, the world is mad.

My mothers best friend is dying now of cancer of the bowel, its been ongoing now for about 3 months, and he just wants to die.

But no they won't let him, they keep him hanging on with drugs, he said to my mother one night (while he was lucid) they're not prolonging my life, they're prolonging my death. I think it's a scandal.
Abstinence Makes the Church Grow Fondlers.

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#5 Post by Lifelinking » July 22nd, 2007, 2:00 pm

This thread is particularly interesting as it highlights an anachronism that forces public bodies to promote and perpetuate insititutionalised discrimination. I reviewed my last post, and thought it important to be clear about the nature of my criticisms of religious schools.

I was reminded of the need for clarity, as I was reading Patrick Reilly's essay, 'Kicking with the Left foot: Being Catholic in Scotland' in Tom Devine's (2000) book, Scotland's Shame? Bigotry and Sectarianism in Modern Scotland. The essay struck a chord with me, as I recalled the very first question posed to me in a new workplace in Maryhill, in the 1970's.

"Whit fit de ye kick wi son?" (for our guests, this is a way of eliciting whether you are protestant or catholic)

In Reilly's essay, he relates criticism of Catholic Schools to the issue of sectarianism. On page 37:
Some who accept the preceding analysis will reply that Catholics already have the remedy in their grasp, that they need only close their by now unnecessary schools and the problem of bigotry will solve itself. This argument begins by assuming something is wrong with our society and then identifies seperate schools as the culprit. But this confuses cause with responsibility. Houses are not to blame for burglars, though without the first there could not be the second; nor should we fault the rope industry because people hang themselves. All over the world people smoke and get lung cancer and this universality allows us to postulate a causal link; but only in Scotland are Catholic schools perniciously divisive, which tels us more about the country than the schools. We are being persuaded that the only way to abolish bigotry is to eliminate, or at least make invisible, religious differences between us. It is a variant of the old axiom from the wars of religion that no land could be at peace till all attended the same church; substitute 'school' and it is the same mindset.
My view is that Reilly has largely missed the point about such schooling. This is is perhaps understandable, as over the years many people have indeed cited their reason for wishing to abolish Catholic schools, as being that it will be an effective way of ending religious bigotry.

Religious bigotry and sectarian hatred are, in my opinion important issues. There are very probably many complex links between our system of schooling and these issues. But these are not to me, in any way the main reason for wishing to see an end to denominational schools.

Let me be explicit. I argue loud and clear for a school system in Scotland that is secular. I do this not because I am anti-Catholic, anti-Muslim, anti-Jewish or anti-Church of the Flying Spaghetti Monster.
I do this because am for the rights of children to enjoy an education that is free of indoctrination.

'Wee people' deserve the best education we can provide for them (just as 'big people' deserve the right to be treated fairly when they are applying for jobs). Places where they can be given the tools to think for themselves. By all means let them find out about the worlds religions, lifestyles, beliefs, ideologies and philosophies while at school. But let us rid ourselves of institutionalised brainwashing.

By definition this also means that I do not want schools that churn out well indoctrinated wee secular humanists. Indoctrination is still indoctrination, even if it is espousing ideas we agree with. In other words, the logical bedfellow of secularism, is a form of pluralism where it is acknowledged that there are many differences in the way that human beings come to make sense of the world about them, and the right for them to be free to do so is enshrined.

Thus If we teach kids to think for themselves, and then they do think for themselves, and decide to become Anarchists, Pagans, Monster Raving Loonys, Rastafarians, Roman Catholics, or even (whisper it softly ) Conservatives, then so be it.

To go back to Patrick Reilly's essay, where does this leave us? I believe it leaves us with a strong argument for secular schools in Scotland. Schools where children of all different backgrounds come together and are taught by teachers of all different backgrounds (that are selected for their jobs on merit alone). It leaves us clear that such an argument is not an 'anti-Catholic' one.
"Who thinks the law has anything to do with justice? It's what we have because we can't have justice."
William McIlvanney

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#6 Post by Compassionist » August 1st, 2007, 1:30 pm

'Wee people' deserve the best education we can provide for them (just as 'big people' deserve the right to be treated fairly when they are applying for jobs). Places where they can be given the tools to think for themselves. By all means let them find out about the worlds religions, lifestyles, beliefs, ideologies and philosophies while at school. But let us rid ourselves of institutionalised brainwashing.
I thoroughly agree with you. Please excuse my ignorance but what's the latest news in this front? Thanks.

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