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The future of the Press (if any)

...on serious topics that don't fit anywhere else at present.
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Nick
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Re: The future of the Press (if any)

#21 Post by Nick » March 18th, 2013, 4:48 pm

Latest post of the previous page:

Alan H wrote:As an aside to this topic, it looks like the Leveson press regulation clauses have just been removed from the libel reform Bill.
I could (easily!) be wrong, but weren't they inserted by the Millipede, just to garm up the works...?
Assuming that gets back to the House of Commons, there is every chance it will be passed. It's far from perfect with some notable changes missing, but at least it's an improvement.
Indeed.
However, back to Leveson and press regulation. David 'call me Dave' Cameron and his cronies don't really want proper, effective regulation of what his friends say in their newspapers, but he has proposed a Royal Charter. I'm still hazy on what this is supposed to do and how it will work, but one analysis of the scope of it seems to have the regulatory body covering everything from national newspapers to Facebook and Twitter. I kid you not: UK Bloggers & Tweeters: Be aware that the Royal Charter re: #Leveson is also aimed at regulating *you*
I don't know quite what a Royal Cahrter is either, but I understand that it means that government ministers won't be able to alter regulations, which they would do under Millipede's original peoposal.

Be that as it may, does it strike anyone else that, for once, there has been some sort of reasonable co-operation betweent the three leading parties? (Ed Balls wasn't involved, for a start!)

It also strikes me as inconsistent to be concerned that the bastards in the press be "properly, effectively regulated", but that the internet should somehow be exempt..... What's the difference?

Be careful what you wish for....

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Alan H
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Re: The future of the Press (if any)

#22 Post by Alan H » March 18th, 2013, 5:30 pm

A Royal Charter is granted by the Privy Council and be changed by them without recourse to Parliament. Its members are MPs or ex-MPs. Lots of scope there for political and undemocratic interference.

There is lots of hot air about whether this is 'statutory underpinning' or not.
Alan Henness

There are three fundamental questions for anyone advocating Brexit:

1. What, precisely, are the significant and tangible benefits of leaving the EU?
2. What damage to the UK and its citizens is an acceptable price to pay for those benefits?
3. Which ruling of the ECJ is most persuasive of the need to leave its jurisdiction?

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Dave B
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Re: The future of the Press (if any)

#23 Post by Dave B » March 18th, 2013, 6:52 pm

There is lots of hot air
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"Look forward; yesterday was a lesson, if you did not learn from it you wasted it."
Me, 2015

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Alan H
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Re: The future of the Press (if any)

#24 Post by Alan H » March 19th, 2013, 11:32 am

Bloggers may face libel fines under press regulation deal
Websites could have to pay exemplary damages if they don't sign up to new regulator, claim opponents of Leveson deal
However, some seem to think this is not the case. I'm sure it's always the case that different interpretations can come out of the meaning of legislation. However, it does seem that the words of the proposed Royal Charter are vague in the extreme. The cynic in me says this is deliberate and that, despite protestations to the contrary, it is the intention that it will cover bloggers, etc some time in the future.

I don't doubt it's difficult to pin a dividing line between journalism and blogging (or even Tweeting), but this rushed Charter doesn't seem to have even tried to.
Alan Henness

There are three fundamental questions for anyone advocating Brexit:

1. What, precisely, are the significant and tangible benefits of leaving the EU?
2. What damage to the UK and its citizens is an acceptable price to pay for those benefits?
3. Which ruling of the ECJ is most persuasive of the need to leave its jurisdiction?

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Alan H
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Re: The future of the Press (if any)

#25 Post by Alan H » March 19th, 2013, 2:11 pm

It's all very simple, really:

Image
Alan Henness

There are three fundamental questions for anyone advocating Brexit:

1. What, precisely, are the significant and tangible benefits of leaving the EU?
2. What damage to the UK and its citizens is an acceptable price to pay for those benefits?
3. Which ruling of the ECJ is most persuasive of the need to leave its jurisdiction?

Fia
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Joined: July 6th, 2007, 8:29 pm

Re: The future of the Press (if any)

#26 Post by Fia » March 19th, 2013, 5:38 pm

Simple? :shock:

I didn't even know where to start...

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Dave B
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Re: The future of the Press (if any)

#27 Post by Dave B » March 19th, 2013, 5:42 pm

My post, previous to yours, Fia, that does not seem to have appeared summed up my feelings as well.

To repeat:

Image
"Look forward; yesterday was a lesson, if you did not learn from it you wasted it."
Me, 2015

Lord Muck oGentry
Posts: 634
Joined: September 1st, 2007, 3:48 pm

Re: The future of the Press (if any)

#28 Post by Lord Muck oGentry » March 19th, 2013, 6:32 pm

Fia wrote: I didn't even know where to start...
With a double six?

:)
What we can't say, we can't say and we can't whistle it either. — Frank Ramsey

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Altfish
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Re: The future of the Press (if any)

#29 Post by Altfish » March 19th, 2013, 7:12 pm

If the Daily Mail, Telegraph and Murdoch papers are against it; it must be correct. :wink:

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Alan H
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Re: The future of the Press (if any)

#30 Post by Alan H » March 19th, 2013, 7:36 pm

Altfish wrote:If the Daily Mail, Telegraph and Murdoch papers are against it; it must be correct. :wink:
Indeed. If the papers start to be enthusiastic for it, that is when we should be VERY suspicious.
Alan Henness

There are three fundamental questions for anyone advocating Brexit:

1. What, precisely, are the significant and tangible benefits of leaving the EU?
2. What damage to the UK and its citizens is an acceptable price to pay for those benefits?
3. Which ruling of the ECJ is most persuasive of the need to leave its jurisdiction?

lewist
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Joined: July 4th, 2007, 8:53 pm

Re: The future of the Press (if any)

#31 Post by lewist » March 19th, 2013, 10:12 pm

It seems they don't like it so they're going to invent their own game. Of course, we don't know what is going to happen here.
Carpe diem. Savour every moment.

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Alan H
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Re: The future of the Press (if any)

#32 Post by Alan H » March 20th, 2013, 2:06 pm

A different take on whether/what bloggers will be included: Bloggers and the new press regulation system
Alan Henness

There are three fundamental questions for anyone advocating Brexit:

1. What, precisely, are the significant and tangible benefits of leaving the EU?
2. What damage to the UK and its citizens is an acceptable price to pay for those benefits?
3. Which ruling of the ECJ is most persuasive of the need to leave its jurisdiction?

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Dave B
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Joined: May 17th, 2010, 9:15 pm

Re: The future of the Press (if any)

#33 Post by Dave B » March 20th, 2013, 2:27 pm

So are indirect references, e.g., "A politician/personality currently under investigation . . ." or those in third person, "It is reported by others that a well known person . . ." also liable I wonder.

"It is reported that a well known Member of Parliament has been questioned regarding illegal actions. Should such a person be found guilty should they suffer exemplary punishment? In addition to the alleged criminal action such a person also has a duty to their constituents to remain in a situation where they can offer the best possible service to them."
"Look forward; yesterday was a lesson, if you did not learn from it you wasted it."
Me, 2015

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Alan H
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Re: The future of the Press (if any)

#34 Post by Alan H » March 20th, 2013, 3:39 pm

Alan Henness

There are three fundamental questions for anyone advocating Brexit:

1. What, precisely, are the significant and tangible benefits of leaving the EU?
2. What damage to the UK and its citizens is an acceptable price to pay for those benefits?
3. Which ruling of the ECJ is most persuasive of the need to leave its jurisdiction?

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Altfish
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Joined: March 26th, 2012, 8:46 am

Re: The future of the Press (if any)

#35 Post by Altfish » March 21st, 2013, 7:57 pm

It is behaviour like this, by The Daily Mail, that proves the need for extra strong press regulation....

http://freethoughtblogs.com/zinniajones ... aily-mail/

...this should be on national TV, but it won't be. The fact that the paper then went back and deleted his posts, it makes me so mad!

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Alan H
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Re: The future of the Press (if any)

#36 Post by Alan H » March 21st, 2013, 8:09 pm

Indeed. Scandalous, irresponsible, vile and other similar words will never be enough.

For further details, see: The death of Lucy Meadows
Alan Henness

There are three fundamental questions for anyone advocating Brexit:

1. What, precisely, are the significant and tangible benefits of leaving the EU?
2. What damage to the UK and its citizens is an acceptable price to pay for those benefits?
3. Which ruling of the ECJ is most persuasive of the need to leave its jurisdiction?

Fia
Posts: 5480
Joined: July 6th, 2007, 8:29 pm

Re: The future of the Press (if any)

#37 Post by Fia » March 21st, 2013, 9:07 pm

Altfish wrote:It is behaviour like this, by The Daily Mail, that proves the need for extra strong press regulation....
http://freethoughtblogs.com/zinniajones ... aily-mail/
Quite, Altfish. I've just spent time counteracting some of the tabloid bilge on f/b re asylum seekers. Because it's in the paper some folk make a bad graphic from disinformation and share it further. Your and Alan's links are ammo. Thank you :kiss:

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Altfish
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Joined: March 26th, 2012, 8:46 am

Re: The future of the Press (if any)

#38 Post by Altfish » October 12th, 2015, 12:39 pm

It appears that the Daily Mail and Rebekah Brooks are taking their revenge on Tom Watson for his Leverson approach.

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