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The future of Government (if any)

...on serious topics that don't fit anywhere else at present.
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Alan H
Posts: 24065
Joined: July 3rd, 2007, 10:26 pm

Re: The future of Government (if any)

#2321 Post by Alan H » October 5th, 2015, 10:45 pm

Latest post of the previous page:

Hunt: tax credit cuts will make Britons work like Chinese or Americans
Health secretary tells Conservative conference fringe meeting that controversial benefit cuts of up to £1,300 were a ‘step towards self-respect’
So Jeremy Hunt thinks that cuts will make Britons as 'hard-working' as the Chinese...
The Health Secretary is peddling an inane Western stereotype, and ignoring the fact that 'hard work' in China is rarely a free choice
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2015-10-05_22h43_09.png (656.3 KiB) Viewed 1910 times
Alan Henness

There are three fundamental questions for anyone advocating Brexit:

1. What, precisely, are the significant and tangible benefits of leaving the EU?
2. What damage to the UK and its citizens is an acceptable price to pay for those benefits?
3. Which ruling of the ECJ is most persuasive of the need to leave its jurisdiction?

Nick
Posts: 11027
Joined: July 4th, 2007, 10:10 am

Re: The future of Government (if any)

#2322 Post by Nick » October 6th, 2015, 12:31 pm

Alan H wrote:From a few months ago: Osborne plan has no basis in economics
The chancellor’s plans, announced in his Mansion House speech, for “permanent budget surpluses” are nothing more than an attempt to outmanoeuvre his opponents (Report, 10 June). They have no basis in economics. Osborne’s proposals are not fit for the complexity of a modern 21st-century economy and, as such, they risk a liquidity crisis that could also trigger banking problems, a fall in GDP, a crash, or all three.

Economies rely on the principle of sectoral balancing, which states that sectors of the economy borrow and lend from and to each other, and their surpluses and debts must arithmetically balance out in monetary terms, because every credit has a corresponding debit. In other words, if one sector of the economy lends to another, it must be in debt by the same amount as the borrower is in credit. The economy is always in balance as a result, if just not at the right place. The government’s budget position is not independent of the rest of the economy, and if it chooses to try to inflexibly run surpluses, and therefore no longer borrow, the knock-on effect to the rest of the economy will be significant. Households, consumers and businesses may have to borrow more overall, and the risk of a personal debt crisis to rival 2008 could be very real indeed.

These plans tie the government’s hands, meaning it won’t be able to respond appropriately to constantly evolving economic circumstances, good or bad. The plan actually takes away one of the central purposes of modern government: to deliver a stable economy in which all can prosper. It is irresponsible for the chancellor to take such risky experiments with the economy to score political points. This policy requires an urgent rethink.

Dr Ha-Joon Chang University of Cambridge
Thomas Piketty Paris School of Economics
David Blanchflower Bruce V Rauner professor of economics at Dartmouth College and ex-monetary policy committee
Prof Mariana Mazzucato RM Phillips professor in the economics of innovation, University of Sussex
Jared Bernstein Former chief economist and economic adviser to vice-president Joe Biden
Prof Simon Wren-Lewis University of Oxford
Prof Victoria Chick University College London
Prof Ozlem Onaran Department of international business and economics, University of Greenwich
Prof Engelbert Stockhammer Professor of economics, University of Kingston
Howard Reed Director, Landman Economics
Richard Murphy Tax Research UK
Stewart Lansley Visiting fellow, Bristol University Townsend Centre for International Poverty Research
Prof Andrew Cumbers Professor of political economy, Adam Smith Business School, University of Glasgow
Prof Malcolm Sawyer, Emeritus professor of economics, Leeds University Business School
Prof George Irvin Professorial research fellow, Soas, University of London
Prof John Weeks Emeritus professor, Soas, University of London
Prof Prem Sikka, Professor of accounting, University of Essex
Prof Christine Cooper Accounting and finance, Strathclyde Business School
Prof Diane Elson, Emeritus professor, University of Essex and chair of UK Women’s Budget Group
Professor Jonathan Michie University of Oxford
Prof Robert McMaster Professor of political economy, Adam Smith Business School, University of Glasgow
Dr Jo Michell Senior lecturer in economics, University of the West of England, Bristol
Prof Sheila Dow Emeritus professor of economics, University of Stirling
Prof John Grahl Professor of European integration, University of Middlesex
Prof Jan Toporowski Professor of economics, Soas, University of London
Prof Philip Arestis University of Cambridge
Prof Giuseppe Fontana Professor of monetary economics, Leeds University Business School
Prof David Spencer Professor of economics and political economy, Leeds University Business School
Prof Alfredo Saad Filho Professor of political economy, Soas, University of London
Prof Mary Mellor Professor emeritus, Northumbria University
Dr Craig Berry Deputy director, Sheffield Political Economy Research Institute (speri)
Prof David Newbery Emeritus professor of Economics, Cambridge University
Prof Hugh Willmott Cass Business School
Prof Steve Keen Professor of economics, Kingston University
Dr Henning Meyer Research associate, Public Policy Group, London School of Economics
Prof John Van Reenen Professor of economics, London School of Economics
Prof Ismail Ertürk Senior lecturer in banking, University of Manchester
Prof Susan Himmelweit Emeritus professor of economics, Open University
Prof Valpy FitzGerald Emeritus professor of international development finance, University of Oxford
Prof Simon Mohun, Emeritus professor of political economy, Queen Mary, University of London
Stewart Wallis, Executive director, New Economics Foundation
Prof Klaus Nielsen, Professor of institutional economics, Birkbeck, University of London
Prof Pritam Singh Professor of economics, Oxford Brookes University
Dr Andrew Mearman Associate professor in economics, UWE Bristol
Prof Matthew Watson Professor of political economy, University of Warwick
Prof Grazia Ietto-Gillies Emeritus professor of applied economics, London South Bank University
Dr Mary V Wrenn Joan Robinson research fellow in heterodox economics, Girton College, University of Cambridge
Geoffrey Hodgson Research professor, University of Hertfordshire
Dr Daniela Gabor Associate professor, UWE Bristol
Prof Bruce Cronin Director, Centre for Business Network Analysis, University of Greenwich
Dr Annina Kaltenbrunner Lecturer in the economics of globalisation & the international economy, Leeds University Business School
Prof Gary Dymski Professor of applied economics, Leeds University Business School
Michael Burke Economist
Dr Russell Smith Senior lecturer in economics, Cardiff School of Management
Prof Philip B. Whyman Professor of economics, University of Central Lancashire
Prof Tony Thirlwall Professor of applied economics, University of Kent
Michael Kitson Cambridge Judge Business School, University of Cambridge
Dr Abigail McKnight Senior research fellow, Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion, London School of Economics
Dr Ken Coutts Assistant director of Research, faculty of economics, University of Cambridge
Prof Robert H Wade London School of Economics
Dr Kalim Siddiqui Department of strategy, marketing and economics, University of Huddersfield
Prof Stuart Holland University of Coimbra
Dr Alberto Paloni Adam Smith Business School, University of Glasgow
Ewa Karwowski Lecturer in economics, Kingston University
Professor Marcus Miller University of Warwick
Dr Gary Slater Leeds University Business School
Professor David Bailey Aston Business School
Dr David Harvie Senior lecturer in finance and political economy, University of Leicester
Barbara Harriss-White Emeritus professor and senior research fellow, area studies, Oxford University
Dr Bruce Philp Head of department, strategy, marketing and economics, Birmingham City Business School
Roberto Veneziani School of economics and finance, Queen Mary, University of London
Dr Julian Wells Principal lecturer in economics, Kingston University, London
Dr Neil Lancastle Department of accounting and finance, De Montfort University
Mimoza Shabani Lecturer in financial economics, University of East London
Dr Ashley L Carreras Principal lecturer in economics and decision analysis, faculty of business and law, De Montfort University
Prof Michael Lipton Research professor of economics, Sussex University
Dr Graham Gudgin Research associate, Centre for Business Research, University of Cambridge and senior economic advisor, Oxford Economics
Prof Geraint Johnes Professor of economics, Lancaster University Management School
Andrew Simms Fellow, New Economics Foundation
Oh dear, oh dear. Not only does the letter imply that the signatories have completely misunderstood the Chancellor's policy, but the list is composed of some of the loopiest academics (and puffed up chancers) in Britain today. But of course, that won't bother the tax-dodging Grauniad.

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Alan H
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Re: The future of Government (if any)

#2323 Post by Alan H » October 6th, 2015, 12:48 pm

Of course, Nick.
Alan Henness

There are three fundamental questions for anyone advocating Brexit:

1. What, precisely, are the significant and tangible benefits of leaving the EU?
2. What damage to the UK and its citizens is an acceptable price to pay for those benefits?
3. Which ruling of the ECJ is most persuasive of the need to leave its jurisdiction?

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Alan H
Posts: 24065
Joined: July 3rd, 2007, 10:26 pm

Re: The future of Government (if any)

#2324 Post by Alan H » October 6th, 2015, 5:00 pm

Theresa May just turned into a 'nasty Tory'. It ain't pretty
In a bid to look like a powerful contender for Conservative leader, Theresa May is channelling her nasty side. She's got it all wrong, writes Cathy Newman
Alan Henness

There are three fundamental questions for anyone advocating Brexit:

1. What, precisely, are the significant and tangible benefits of leaving the EU?
2. What damage to the UK and its citizens is an acceptable price to pay for those benefits?
3. Which ruling of the ECJ is most persuasive of the need to leave its jurisdiction?

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Alan H
Posts: 24065
Joined: July 3rd, 2007, 10:26 pm

Re: The future of Government (if any)

#2325 Post by Alan H » October 7th, 2015, 11:44 am

Alan Henness

There are three fundamental questions for anyone advocating Brexit:

1. What, precisely, are the significant and tangible benefits of leaving the EU?
2. What damage to the UK and its citizens is an acceptable price to pay for those benefits?
3. Which ruling of the ECJ is most persuasive of the need to leave its jurisdiction?

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Dave B
Posts: 17809
Joined: May 17th, 2010, 9:15 pm

Re: The future of Government (if any)

#2326 Post by Dave B » October 7th, 2015, 2:40 pm

I cannot see how The Cost Of Living is measurable by age, assuming youngsters are not being supported by tgeir parents. If it costs a 24yo £x per week to pay rent and eat then why shoukd they get kess than a 26yo?

Productivity if a function of education+training+experience+inherent skills and attitudes (+ good bosses often). Young people need access to ways to build on all those - but be able to live at tge same time. If they cannot support themselves they stand little chance at advancing their situation.
"Look forward; yesterday was a lesson, if you did not learn from it you wasted it."
Me, 2015

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Alan H
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Joined: July 3rd, 2007, 10:26 pm

Re: The future of Government (if any)

#2327 Post by Alan H » October 8th, 2015, 3:05 pm

Dave B wrote:I cannot see how The Cost Of Living is measurable by age, assuming youngsters are not being supported by tgeir parents. If it costs a 24yo £x per week to pay rent and eat then why shoukd they get kess than a 26yo?

Productivity if a function of education+training+experience+inherent skills and attitudes (+ good bosses often). Young people need access to ways to build on all those - but be able to live at tge same time. If they cannot support themselves they stand little chance at advancing their situation.
Indeed. But that's not the way the Tories think.
Alan Henness

There are three fundamental questions for anyone advocating Brexit:

1. What, precisely, are the significant and tangible benefits of leaving the EU?
2. What damage to the UK and its citizens is an acceptable price to pay for those benefits?
3. Which ruling of the ECJ is most persuasive of the need to leave its jurisdiction?

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Alan H
Posts: 24065
Joined: July 3rd, 2007, 10:26 pm

Re: The future of Government (if any)

#2328 Post by Alan H » October 8th, 2015, 3:07 pm

Tory conference: Cameron's 'assault on poverty' pledge belied by new figures
The Conservatives, Cameron said, must live up to their great traditions of social reform and be the right party “for those who work hard, want to get on and want more money at the end of the month”. Insisting Britain was on the brink of something special, he claimed “hope is returning and we are moving into the light”, allowing the Conservatives to be seen as the “party of the fair chance, the party of the equal shot”.

But the new research by the Resolution Foundation – now chaired by former Conservative minister David Willetts – suggests the government’s welfare cuts introduced in the budget in a bid to cut the deficit will drive at least 200,000 working households into poverty under a definition that the government is abolishing.

The thinktank’s analysis also indicates that the number of all households – both in and out of work – that will be in poverty at the end of the parliament is projected to rise by 700,000 to nearly 4 million.
Conservative MPs are already braced for protests next April when the cuts to tax credit thresholds, set out in the summer budget, start to bite. There are reports that Treasury ministers are considering delaying sending out letters spelling out the details of the cuts until after Christmas.
Alan Henness

There are three fundamental questions for anyone advocating Brexit:

1. What, precisely, are the significant and tangible benefits of leaving the EU?
2. What damage to the UK and its citizens is an acceptable price to pay for those benefits?
3. Which ruling of the ECJ is most persuasive of the need to leave its jurisdiction?

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Dave B
Posts: 17809
Joined: May 17th, 2010, 9:15 pm

Re: The future of Government (if any)

#2329 Post by Dave B » October 8th, 2015, 3:41 pm

Alan H wrote:
Dave B wrote:I cannot see how The Cost Of Living is measurable by age, assuming youngsters are not being supported by tgeir parents. If it costs a 24yo £x per week to pay rent and eat then why shoukd they get kess than a 26yo?

Productivity if a function of education+training+experience+inherent skills and attitudes (+ good bosses often). Young people need access to ways to build on all those - but be able to live at tge same time. If they cannot support themselves they stand little chance at advancing their situation.
Indeed. But that's not the way the Tories think.
Do the Tories think?
"Look forward; yesterday was a lesson, if you did not learn from it you wasted it."
Me, 2015

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Alan H
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Re: The future of Government (if any)

#2330 Post by Alan H » October 9th, 2015, 11:26 am

Instead of punishing the poor for being lazy or not working hard enough or taking money off them to encourage them: The remarkable thing that happens to poor kids when you give their parents a little money
Not only did the extra income appear to lower the instance of behavioral and emotional disorders among the children, but, perhaps even more important, it also boosted two key personality traits that tend to go hand in hand with long-term positive life outcomes.

The first is conscientiousness. People who lack it tend to lie, break rules and have trouble paying attention. The second is agreeableness, which leads to a comfort around people and aptness for teamwork. And both are strongly correlated with various forms of later life success and happiness.

The researchers also observed a slight uptick in neuroticism, which, they explained, is a good sign. Neuroticism is generally considered to be a positive trait so long as one does not have too much of it.

"We're talking about all sorts of good, positive, long-term things," said Emilia Simeonova, a professor at Johns Hopkins University who studies the economics of health, and one of the paper's co-authors. "There are very powerful correlations between conscientiousness and agreeableness and the ability to hold a job, to maintain a steady relationship. The two allow for people to succeed socially and professionally."
Alan Henness

There are three fundamental questions for anyone advocating Brexit:

1. What, precisely, are the significant and tangible benefits of leaving the EU?
2. What damage to the UK and its citizens is an acceptable price to pay for those benefits?
3. Which ruling of the ECJ is most persuasive of the need to leave its jurisdiction?

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Dave B
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Joined: May 17th, 2010, 9:15 pm

Re: The future of Government (if any)

#2331 Post by Dave B » October 9th, 2015, 12:15 pm

That rings a bell some where, sure I remember a similar finding some time ago.
"Look forward; yesterday was a lesson, if you did not learn from it you wasted it."
Me, 2015

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Alan H
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Re: The future of Government (if any)

#2332 Post by Alan H » October 9th, 2015, 1:39 pm

Dave B wrote:That rings a bell some where, sure I remember a similar finding some time ago.
It also got a mention in last week's New Scientist.

But it's amazing, isn't it? Give people just a bit more money so they're not worrying about how they will be able to feed their kids...
Alan Henness

There are three fundamental questions for anyone advocating Brexit:

1. What, precisely, are the significant and tangible benefits of leaving the EU?
2. What damage to the UK and its citizens is an acceptable price to pay for those benefits?
3. Which ruling of the ECJ is most persuasive of the need to leave its jurisdiction?

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Altfish
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Joined: March 26th, 2012, 8:46 am

Re: The future of Government (if any)

#2333 Post by Altfish » October 9th, 2015, 1:45 pm

But that doesn't sit well with the nasty party. Whatever you do, don't confuse them with facts and statistics, it's all about dogma!

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Dave B
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Re: The future of Government (if any)

#2334 Post by Dave B » October 9th, 2015, 3:15 pm

There's been an abridged version of Thatcher's approved bio on R4 in the am this week. Last episode today ended with Thatcher being very disappointed when the Oxford academics refused her an honorary degree, mainly because she dismantled the UK's research functions way back then.

Looks like her heirs and successors are into the same game, had an email appeal today from Dr Jenny Rohn,
- Send a postcard to George Osborne telling him why science is vital to you at scienceisvital.org.uk/postcard
- Come to our rally in London on 26 October – tickets available here – attend alocal party or watch the live-stream
- Spread the word – forward this email to friends and family (including non-scientists), and if you use social media (#scienceisvital), share our campaign page: http://www.scienceisvital.org.uk/as-vital-as-ever
 
(whole thing much longer)
"Look forward; yesterday was a lesson, if you did not learn from it you wasted it."
Me, 2015

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Alan H
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Re: The future of Government (if any)

#2335 Post by Alan H » October 9th, 2015, 3:21 pm

I sent my postcard off a few days ago...
Alan Henness

There are three fundamental questions for anyone advocating Brexit:

1. What, precisely, are the significant and tangible benefits of leaving the EU?
2. What damage to the UK and its citizens is an acceptable price to pay for those benefits?
3. Which ruling of the ECJ is most persuasive of the need to leave its jurisdiction?

User avatar
Dave B
Posts: 17809
Joined: May 17th, 2010, 9:15 pm

Re: The future of Government (if any)

#2336 Post by Dave B » October 9th, 2015, 4:57 pm

Alan H wrote:I sent my postcard off a few days ago...
Mine's on its way!
"Look forward; yesterday was a lesson, if you did not learn from it you wasted it."
Me, 2015

thundril
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Joined: July 4th, 2008, 5:02 pm

Re: The future of Government (if any)

#2337 Post by thundril » October 10th, 2015, 5:48 pm

Austerity, or otherwise?

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Alan H
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Re: The future of Government (if any)

#2338 Post by Alan H » October 11th, 2015, 11:46 am

Probably of little interest to anyone outside London, but if only the Tories where as enthusiastic about building social housing as they are about this damned bridge...

Met police urged to investigate garden bridge contracts
Alan Henness

There are three fundamental questions for anyone advocating Brexit:

1. What, precisely, are the significant and tangible benefits of leaving the EU?
2. What damage to the UK and its citizens is an acceptable price to pay for those benefits?
3. Which ruling of the ECJ is most persuasive of the need to leave its jurisdiction?

User avatar
Dave B
Posts: 17809
Joined: May 17th, 2010, 9:15 pm

Re: The future of Government (if any)

#2339 Post by Dave B » October 11th, 2015, 1:24 pm

I am sure it will all turn out to be a simple misunderstanding, or a leftie plot to make dear Boris look even more indiotic than he does already, or ...
"Look forward; yesterday was a lesson, if you did not learn from it you wasted it."
Me, 2015

thundril
Posts: 3607
Joined: July 4th, 2008, 5:02 pm

Re: The future of Government (if any)

#2340 Post by thundril » October 11th, 2015, 4:14 pm

There needs to be a 'leftie p-lot' to show people vjust how clever Boris Johnson is. He's a cunning nasty piece of work with a jolly prankster, harmless buffoon persona.

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Alan H
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Re: The future of Government (if any)

#2341 Post by Alan H » October 11th, 2015, 4:20 pm

thundril wrote:There needs to be a 'leftie p-lot' to show people vjust how clever Boris Johnson is. He's a cunning nasty piece of work with a jolly prankster, harmless buffoon persona.
+1
Alan Henness

There are three fundamental questions for anyone advocating Brexit:

1. What, precisely, are the significant and tangible benefits of leaving the EU?
2. What damage to the UK and its citizens is an acceptable price to pay for those benefits?
3. Which ruling of the ECJ is most persuasive of the need to leave its jurisdiction?

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