INFORMATION

This website uses cookies to store information on your computer. Some of these cookies are essential to make our site work and others help us to improve by giving us some insight into how the site is being used. For further information, see our Privacy Policy. Continuing to use this website is acceptance of these cookies.

The future of the NHS (if any)

...on serious topics that don't fit anywhere else at present.
Post Reply
Message
Author
User avatar
Alan H
Posts: 24067
Joined: July 3rd, 2007, 10:26 pm

Re: The future of the NHS (if any)

#1361 Post by Alan H » September 27th, 2015, 1:22 am

Latest post of the previous page:

BMA to ballot junior doctors on industrial action
Junior doctors in England are to be balloted on industrial action over government plans to introduce a new contract from August 2016.

Critics say the new contract involves pay cuts of up to 30%, with overtime rates scrapped for work between 7am and 10pm on every day except Sunday.

The British Medical Association said the ballot reflected doctors' anger.
Alan Henness

There are three fundamental questions for anyone advocating Brexit:

1. What, precisely, are the significant and tangible benefits of leaving the EU?
2. What damage to the UK and its citizens is an acceptable price to pay for those benefits?
3. Which ruling of the ECJ is most persuasive of the need to leave its jurisdiction?

User avatar
Alan H
Posts: 24067
Joined: July 3rd, 2007, 10:26 pm

Re: The future of the NHS (if any)

#1362 Post by Alan H » September 28th, 2015, 12:59 am

By Tory MP, Dr Sarah Wollaston: A fight over doctors’ hours will help no one
This dispute is about far more than pay. After all, young people rarely choose a career in medicine because they are motivated by money. But the attempt to re-designate Saturdays up to 10pm as standard time, among many other changes that will result in some juniors facing significant cuts to their pay, has been the last straw.

Why do the Government and NHS employers seem bent on a disruptive fight with the BMA? One stated aim is to try to reduce the high number of deaths among patients admitted to hospital at weekends by staffing them more evenly. Another is to attract more doctors to train in areas where there are shortages, such as accident and emergency and general practice.
Alan Henness

There are three fundamental questions for anyone advocating Brexit:

1. What, precisely, are the significant and tangible benefits of leaving the EU?
2. What damage to the UK and its citizens is an acceptable price to pay for those benefits?
3. Which ruling of the ECJ is most persuasive of the need to leave its jurisdiction?

User avatar
Dave B
Posts: 17809
Joined: May 17th, 2010, 9:15 pm

Re: The future of the NHS (if any)

#1363 Post by Dave B » September 28th, 2015, 8:45 pm

That woman seems to be about the only Tory with brain cells and the courage to use them!
"Look forward; yesterday was a lesson, if you did not learn from it you wasted it."
Me, 2015

User avatar
Alan H
Posts: 24067
Joined: July 3rd, 2007, 10:26 pm

Re: The future of the NHS (if any)

#1364 Post by Alan H » September 29th, 2015, 12:19 am

Dave B wrote:That woman seems to be about the only Tory with brain cells and the courage to use them!
Yup. I've met her a couple of times - very intelligent, sensible and nice.
Alan Henness

There are three fundamental questions for anyone advocating Brexit:

1. What, precisely, are the significant and tangible benefits of leaving the EU?
2. What damage to the UK and its citizens is an acceptable price to pay for those benefits?
3. Which ruling of the ECJ is most persuasive of the need to leave its jurisdiction?

User avatar
Alan H
Posts: 24067
Joined: July 3rd, 2007, 10:26 pm

Re: The future of the NHS (if any)

#1365 Post by Alan H » October 1st, 2015, 12:55 am

NHS to begin denying people hearing aids for first time
The NHS will start denying people with hearing problems access to hearing aids for the first time from Thursday in a controversial move that critics claim will worsen sufferers’ social isolation.

The GP-led NHS clinical commissioning group in North Staffordshire is taking the unprecedented step of ceasing to provide free hearing aids to mainly elderly people in its area with mild hearing loss.

It is also making it harder for those with moderate hearing loss to get access to hearing aids by introducing new eligibility criteria against which patients will be judged.

Campaigners and hearing experts have criticised the new policy as “ill thought-through, baffling and unprecedented”.

The CCG says the new restrictions are necessary to help it save money, and will save it about £200,000 in the first year. But the charity Action on Hearing Loss claims that hearing aids cost the NHS as little as £90 each.

The CCG estimates that its new policy will lead to about 500 people a year no longer getting a hearing aid to help mitigate the decline in their hearing capacity, which sufferers say damages their quality of life.

They will now have to decide whether to pay the much higher prices charged by high street providers, which can charge many thousands of pounds.
Alan Henness

There are three fundamental questions for anyone advocating Brexit:

1. What, precisely, are the significant and tangible benefits of leaving the EU?
2. What damage to the UK and its citizens is an acceptable price to pay for those benefits?
3. Which ruling of the ECJ is most persuasive of the need to leave its jurisdiction?

thundril
Posts: 3607
Joined: July 4th, 2008, 5:02 pm

Re: The future of the NHS (if any)

#1366 Post by thundril » October 1st, 2015, 1:15 am

Alan H wrote:NHS to begin denying people hearing aids for first time
The NHS will start denying people with hearing problems access to hearing aids for the first time from Thursday in a controversial move that critics claim will worsen sufferers’ social isolation.

The GP-led NHS clinical commissioning group in North Staffordshire is taking the unprecedented step of ceasing to provide free hearing aids to mainly elderly people in its area with mild hearing loss.

It is also making it harder for those with moderate hearing loss to get access to hearing aids by introducing new eligibility criteria against which patients will be judged.

Campaigners and hearing experts have criticised the new policy as “ill thought-through, baffling and unprecedented”.

The CCG says the new restrictions are necessary to help it save money, and will save it about £200,000 in the first year. But the charity Action on Hearing Loss claims that hearing aids cost the NHS as little as £90 each.

The CCG estimates that its new policy will lead to about 500 people a year no longer getting a hearing aid to help mitigate the decline in their hearing capacity, which sufferers say damages their quality of life.

They will now have to decide whether to pay the much higher prices charged by high street providers, which can charge many thousands of pounds.
Oh, FFS! Do we have to wait five more years before we can start to change this shit?

User avatar
Altfish
Posts: 1821
Joined: March 26th, 2012, 8:46 am

Re: The future of the NHS (if any)

#1367 Post by Altfish » October 1st, 2015, 7:03 am

thundril wrote:
Alan H wrote:NHS to begin denying people hearing aids for first time
The NHS will start denying people with hearing problems access to hearing aids for the first time from Thursday in a controversial move that critics claim will worsen sufferers’ social isolation.

The GP-led NHS clinical commissioning group in North Staffordshire is taking the unprecedented step of ceasing to provide free hearing aids to mainly elderly people in its area with mild hearing loss.

It is also making it harder for those with moderate hearing loss to get access to hearing aids by introducing new eligibility criteria against which patients will be judged.

Campaigners and hearing experts have criticised the new policy as “ill thought-through, baffling and unprecedented”.

The CCG says the new restrictions are necessary to help it save money, and will save it about £200,000 in the first year. But the charity Action on Hearing Loss claims that hearing aids cost the NHS as little as £90 each.

The CCG estimates that its new policy will lead to about 500 people a year no longer getting a hearing aid to help mitigate the decline in their hearing capacity, which sufferers say damages their quality of life.

They will now have to decide whether to pay the much higher prices charged by high street providers, which can charge many thousands of pounds.
Oh, FFS! Do we have to wait five more years before we can start to change this shit?
Longer than that, Labour won't be ready for government by 2020, it'll be at least another 5-years before they get their act together.

User avatar
Alan H
Posts: 24067
Joined: July 3rd, 2007, 10:26 pm

Re: The future of the NHS (if any)

#1368 Post by Alan H » October 1st, 2015, 10:00 am

thundril wrote:Oh, FFS! Do we have to wait five more years before we can start to change this shit?
We asked the Health Secretary, Jeremy Hunt, about this."Nothing to do with me, guv! CCGs - run by local doctors - are entirely responsible for determining local priorities. I couldn't interfere in their decisions even if I wanted to. Nope, nothing to do with me..."
Alan Henness

There are three fundamental questions for anyone advocating Brexit:

1. What, precisely, are the significant and tangible benefits of leaving the EU?
2. What damage to the UK and its citizens is an acceptable price to pay for those benefits?
3. Which ruling of the ECJ is most persuasive of the need to leave its jurisdiction?

User avatar
Alan H
Posts: 24067
Joined: July 3rd, 2007, 10:26 pm

Re: The future of the NHS (if any)

#1369 Post by Alan H » October 3rd, 2015, 5:26 pm

Alan Henness

There are three fundamental questions for anyone advocating Brexit:

1. What, precisely, are the significant and tangible benefits of leaving the EU?
2. What damage to the UK and its citizens is an acceptable price to pay for those benefits?
3. Which ruling of the ECJ is most persuasive of the need to leave its jurisdiction?

User avatar
Alan H
Posts: 24067
Joined: July 3rd, 2007, 10:26 pm

Re: The future of the NHS (if any)

#1370 Post by Alan H » October 4th, 2015, 11:53 am

Anyone see a problem with GPs not referring you because their practice would get more money if they stay below their quota of referrals?

Labour calls for urgent review of GP referral incentives following Pulse investigation
Alan Henness

There are three fundamental questions for anyone advocating Brexit:

1. What, precisely, are the significant and tangible benefits of leaving the EU?
2. What damage to the UK and its citizens is an acceptable price to pay for those benefits?
3. Which ruling of the ECJ is most persuasive of the need to leave its jurisdiction?

User avatar
Alan H
Posts: 24067
Joined: July 3rd, 2007, 10:26 pm

Re: The future of the NHS (if any)

#1371 Post by Alan H » October 4th, 2015, 12:35 pm

Ministers ‘are hiding details of £2bn NHS cash crisis
Heidi Alexander, the shadow health secretary, said on Saturday: “This appears to be a cynical attempt to suppress bad news ahead of the Tory party conference. It makes a mockery of Tory claims to be committed to transparency in the NHS, and leaves Jeremy Hunt with very serious questions to answer. These figures must now be published in full as a matter of urgency.
Alan Henness

There are three fundamental questions for anyone advocating Brexit:

1. What, precisely, are the significant and tangible benefits of leaving the EU?
2. What damage to the UK and its citizens is an acceptable price to pay for those benefits?
3. Which ruling of the ECJ is most persuasive of the need to leave its jurisdiction?

User avatar
Alan H
Posts: 24067
Joined: July 3rd, 2007, 10:26 pm

Re: The future of the NHS (if any)

#1372 Post by Alan H » October 5th, 2015, 1:45 pm

Ex-health minister Dr Dan Poulter: This junior doctor contract puts patients in danger
I am not a professional politician, but one of an increasingly rare breed among MPs: someone who has experience of the world outside politics. I worked as a junior doctor in London, the south-east and the east of England for about 10 years across a range of specialities including A&E, rheumatology, general surgery, orthopaedics, obstetrics and gynaecology and mental health. I have always been impressed with the compassion, altruism and dedication to patient care of the overwhelming majority of doctors I have worked alongside. Medicine has never been a nine-to-five job for any doctor, particularly junior doctors, who are the true workhorses of the medical team, routinely working night-times and weekends and often working extra hours they are not paid for in order to do the right thing by patients and their relatives.

Junior doctors are not easily roused. They are rightly upset about proposed cuts to their pay, but the recent unprecedented decision to ballot for strike action is not fundamentally about money. It is rooted in very valid concerns about a contract that could compromise patient safety.
Alan Henness

There are three fundamental questions for anyone advocating Brexit:

1. What, precisely, are the significant and tangible benefits of leaving the EU?
2. What damage to the UK and its citizens is an acceptable price to pay for those benefits?
3. Which ruling of the ECJ is most persuasive of the need to leave its jurisdiction?

User avatar
Alan H
Posts: 24067
Joined: July 3rd, 2007, 10:26 pm

Re: The future of the NHS (if any)

#1373 Post by Alan H » October 5th, 2015, 1:56 pm

Alan Henness

There are three fundamental questions for anyone advocating Brexit:

1. What, precisely, are the significant and tangible benefits of leaving the EU?
2. What damage to the UK and its citizens is an acceptable price to pay for those benefits?
3. Which ruling of the ECJ is most persuasive of the need to leave its jurisdiction?

User avatar
Alan H
Posts: 24067
Joined: July 3rd, 2007, 10:26 pm

Re: The future of the NHS (if any)

#1374 Post by Alan H » October 8th, 2015, 12:46 am

The Hunt file: doctors' dossier of patients 'put at risk' by health secretary
Medics compile list of names whose lives, they say, were put in danger because they were misled by Jeremy Hunt into thinking hospitals do not provide 24/7 care
The doctors behind the dossier said such cases are the result of what they called “the Hunt effect”, namely that some patients are holding off seeking treatment at a weekend – including women who are about to give birth – because they think they will not be well cared-for or even die as a result.
Alan Henness

There are three fundamental questions for anyone advocating Brexit:

1. What, precisely, are the significant and tangible benefits of leaving the EU?
2. What damage to the UK and its citizens is an acceptable price to pay for those benefits?
3. Which ruling of the ECJ is most persuasive of the need to leave its jurisdiction?

thundril
Posts: 3607
Joined: July 4th, 2008, 5:02 pm

Re: The future of the NHS (if any)

#1375 Post by thundril » October 12th, 2015, 4:56 pm


User avatar
Alan H
Posts: 24067
Joined: July 3rd, 2007, 10:26 pm

Re: The future of the NHS (if any)

#1376 Post by Alan H » October 12th, 2015, 6:24 pm

:pointlaugh:
Alan Henness

There are three fundamental questions for anyone advocating Brexit:

1. What, precisely, are the significant and tangible benefits of leaving the EU?
2. What damage to the UK and its citizens is an acceptable price to pay for those benefits?
3. Which ruling of the ECJ is most persuasive of the need to leave its jurisdiction?

User avatar
Dave B
Posts: 17809
Joined: May 17th, 2010, 9:15 pm

Re: The future of the NHS (if any)

#1377 Post by Dave B » October 12th, 2015, 8:11 pm

:laughter:
"Look forward; yesterday was a lesson, if you did not learn from it you wasted it."
Me, 2015

User avatar
Alan H
Posts: 24067
Joined: July 3rd, 2007, 10:26 pm

Re: The future of the NHS (if any)

#1378 Post by Alan H » October 15th, 2015, 11:15 am

A wry look at Jeremy Hunt's stupid announcement that GPs will not be needed in 20 years: If our diagnostic skills become obsolete, I’ll eat my hoverboard
Alan Henness

There are three fundamental questions for anyone advocating Brexit:

1. What, precisely, are the significant and tangible benefits of leaving the EU?
2. What damage to the UK and its citizens is an acceptable price to pay for those benefits?
3. Which ruling of the ECJ is most persuasive of the need to leave its jurisdiction?

User avatar
Dave B
Posts: 17809
Joined: May 17th, 2010, 9:15 pm

Re: The future of the NHS (if any)

#1379 Post by Dave B » October 15th, 2015, 11:30 am

Alan H wrote:A wry look at Jeremy Hunt's stupid announcement that GPs will not be needed in 20 years: If our diagnostic skills become obsolete, I’ll eat my hoverboard
Typical political rhetoric!

Having said that, in some fields, diagnostic systems other than a dictor's knowledge and perception of the symptoms are needed and are being developed. If "technology" includes trained rats then they are currently doing much better than normal diagnodtic techniques.

Now, if the electronic nose ever really gets to live up to its promise...

Not sure thst doctors are in danger but pharmacists now offer "diagnostic" services that once were the province of hospitals. Still needs a doctor to work out why the patient has high blood pressure or sugar levels, "electronic experts are still not reliable enough to prescribe without a trained human in the loop (maybe never will be).
"Look forward; yesterday was a lesson, if you did not learn from it you wasted it."
Me, 2015

User avatar
Alan H
Posts: 24067
Joined: July 3rd, 2007, 10:26 pm

Re: The future of the NHS (if any)

#1380 Post by Alan H » October 15th, 2015, 12:06 pm

Dave B wrote:
Alan H wrote:A wry look at Jeremy Hunt's stupid announcement that GPs will not be needed in 20 years: If our diagnostic skills become obsolete, I’ll eat my hoverboard
Typical political rhetoric!

Having said that, in some fields, diagnostic systems other than a dictor's knowledge and perception of the symptoms are needed and are being developed. If "technology" includes trained rats then they are currently doing much better than normal diagnodtic techniques.

Now, if the electronic nose ever really gets to live up to its promise...

Not sure thst doctors are in danger but pharmacists now offer "diagnostic" services that once were the province of hospitals. Still needs a doctor to work out why the patient has high blood pressure or sugar levels, "electronic experts are still not reliable enough to prescribe without a trained human in the loop (maybe never will be).
No doubt there will be technological innovations that will amaze us, but I strongly suspect Hunt has been watching too much Star Trek.
Alan Henness

There are three fundamental questions for anyone advocating Brexit:

1. What, precisely, are the significant and tangible benefits of leaving the EU?
2. What damage to the UK and its citizens is an acceptable price to pay for those benefits?
3. Which ruling of the ECJ is most persuasive of the need to leave its jurisdiction?

User avatar
Alan H
Posts: 24067
Joined: July 3rd, 2007, 10:26 pm

Re: The future of the NHS (if any)

#1381 Post by Alan H » October 19th, 2015, 1:57 pm

Dear Jeremy
Dear Jeremy,

I write to you as a junior doctor on the verge of becoming a consultant. I write to you as a family member with young nephews and a niece, and parents about to enter older age. I write to you as a patient dying of cancer. Therefore the NHS is a central and vital part of my life.

Three weeks ago I came pretty close to dying from a serious consequence of cancer therapy. It was the junior doctors and nurses, not the Consultants who got me better from that episode. The professionalism and compassion from these young people was amazing.

Junior doctors have a huge amount of responsibility, even from day one after graduation. I’ve saved a fair few lives in my career. I’ve also been so tired that I could barely see straight after my seventh consecutive night shift. Protecting our young doctors so they can work, develop and flourish is essential and as Secretary of State is part of your responsibility. Rewarding them properly for their dedication and hard work is only fair…

I was a junior doctor when the MTAS debacle happened which saw many of my friends and colleagues leave the country. Many have since returned, but your plan will see a much larger exodus of young talented doctors to the rest of the world.

Please do not impose your ridiculously unfair contract on us. Sadly I think we are probably only your first target; no doubt you will be coming for the nurses, midwifes, physiotherapists, dieticians, speech therapists, ward clerks next… The NHS is a cornerstone of the United Kingdom. I am proud to work for it and would not want to receive cancer treatment anywhere else. Please do not destroy it for future generations.

An extremely worried and angry doctor and patient,

Kate
Alan Henness

There are three fundamental questions for anyone advocating Brexit:

1. What, precisely, are the significant and tangible benefits of leaving the EU?
2. What damage to the UK and its citizens is an acceptable price to pay for those benefits?
3. Which ruling of the ECJ is most persuasive of the need to leave its jurisdiction?

Post Reply