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Books enjoyed

Enter here to talk about books, art, literature, film, TV and anything else to do with popular culture.
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Dave B
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Joined: May 17th, 2010, 9:15 pm

Re: Books enjoyed

#61 Postby Dave B » March 23rd, 2015, 2:04 pm

Latest post of the previous page:

:pointlaugh:
"Look forward; yesterday was a lesson, if you did not learn from it you wasted it."
Me, 2015

Athena
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Re: Books enjoyed

#62 Postby Athena » April 20th, 2015, 12:11 pm

Here's a link to my review of Edzard Ernst's A Scientist in Wonderland. I'm relieved to note that the author is delighted with it and has been tweeting it enthusiastically.

http://www.skepticat.org/2015/04/a-scie ... onderland/

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Dave B
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Re: Books enjoyed

#63 Postby Dave B » April 20th, 2015, 2:18 pm

Athena wrote:Here's a link to my review of Edzard Ernst's A Scientist in Wonderland. I'm relieved to note that the author is delighted with it and has been tweeting it enthusiastically.

http://www.skepticat.org/2015/04/a-scie ... onderland/
Athena, when I hit the link I briefly see the review then get a sort of blank page with tge sidebar and a "polite notice".Tried hitting "home" , review comes back then goes away again to blank column!

Later: OK, found it in a pile at the very bottom of the page!
"Look forward; yesterday was a lesson, if you did not learn from it you wasted it."
Me, 2015

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Alan H
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Re: Books enjoyed

#64 Postby Alan H » April 20th, 2015, 2:56 pm

It's a 'responsive' template that adjusts to the size of the screen being used. If your screen is deemed too small, it reverts to a small screen type display. I'll tweak it a bit...
Alan Henness

What, precisely, are the significant and tangible benefits of leaving the EU? Anyone? Hello? Hello?

"We're all in this together, but some are more in it than others."
— Me, with apologies to Napoleon

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Dave B
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Re: Books enjoyed

#65 Postby Dave B » April 20th, 2015, 3:21 pm

Alan H wrote:It's a 'responsive' template that adjusts to the size of the screen being used. If your screen is deemed too small, it reverts to a small screen type display. I'll tweak it a bit...
R I C!

Was viewing it on my tablet. Prefer a narrow column so that I can expand the image and reading is not such a strain!
"Look forward; yesterday was a lesson, if you did not learn from it you wasted it."
Me, 2015

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Dave B
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Re: Books enjoyed

#66 Postby Dave B » June 8th, 2016, 3:24 pm

About 60 years ago, feeling a bit lost, confused and lonely, I found a notice about the Lewisham humanist group. Suddenly I knew that I was not entirely alone. That lttle bit of reading had a profound effect on me - unfortunately I could not take it further at the tine, the home environment did not encourage such and there was a lower age limit of 18 for membership, but the knowledge helped.

I have meandered all my life eince the, looking for a path. I was attracted in various directions but made critically bad decisions early on.

What has this to do with books? Well, today I indulged in my frequent habit of buying a 2nd book in Geoff's shop then browsing it in my favourite lunchery.

The book is, "The meaning of Modern Design" by Peter Dormer. No longer modern, of course, published 1990, hardly anything digital in it.

But that only goes for the "hard" design, what the author has to say about design in terms of ethics, philosophy, psychology and politics and economics is still current - one can ask the same questions today.

I have only tickled the surface as yet but, for at least this aspect of my life this could become a bit of an important book for me. Bit late again, even had I had to wait until 1990 reading it then might have made a big difference.

Few realise what effect "design" has on so many aspects of everyday life - it is the essence of the man-made world, it leads rather than follows us, we do what it (or those who commissioned/created it) wants more often than not. They do get it fundamentally wrong at times I have to admit! :D

The differences between engineering, craftmanship and pure design are described but, for me, it is their mingling together with ethics and psychology stirred in that holds the key. That counts whether it is an organic loo for Africa whose appearance enhances the landscape or one the great piles, such as the Burg Khalifa, built for the filthy rich. As much for a new concept in arthritis sufferer's cutlery as the latest innovations in luxury cars.
"Look forward; yesterday was a lesson, if you did not learn from it you wasted it."
Me, 2015

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Nutellathehun
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Re: Books enjoyed

#67 Postby Nutellathehun » June 23rd, 2016, 7:38 pm

Though I tend to read quite a bit of fiction when not pursuing things relevant to my profession (education), I very much enjoyed Dreyfuss and Kelly's All Things Shining, the subtitle of which accurately states that the book is about reading Western classics to find meaning in a secular age.
"Nothing is enough for the man to whom enough is too little."
~Epicurus

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animist
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Re: Books enjoyed

#68 Postby animist » July 5th, 2016, 4:34 pm

the last three novels I read were all by women and all concern, in different ways, time frames and locales, the unsuccessful attempts of Western culture to mingle with, and basically dominate other, very different, cultures. The books are Lionel Shriver's "Game Control", which is about the futility of population control programmes in Kenya; Deborah Moggach's "Hot Water Man", set in Pakistan and about an English couple and an American entrepreneur's disastrous affaire with a high-class Pakistani girl; and the monster read of them all, Barbara Kingsolver's "The Poisonwood Bible", which charts the disastrous attempt of an American Baptist family to evangelise in the newly independent Belgian Congo. All are very well worth reading for sceptics and humanists!

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Nick
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Re: Books enjoyed

#69 Postby Nick » April 6th, 2017, 9:06 pm


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animist
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Re: Books enjoyed

#70 Postby animist » June 30th, 2017, 10:25 am

reading my last post here makes me wonder - does anyone else here read mainstream novels? Anyway, I can't recommend too much Monica Ali's "Brick Lane". It details the gradual self-realisation of a very intelligent but dutiful Bangladeshi woman called Nazneen who is married off by Abba (dad) to a silly and pompous, if decent, husband in London (hence the title). After much patient acceptance of the gender inequalities which surround her life as a devout Muslim, she establishes a degree of autonomy when she declines to accompany him husband back to Bangladesh. Nothing horrible happens here, thank God (which is what Nazneen would say, I guess)


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