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Britain Is A 'Christian Nation', apparently

For topics that are more about faith, religion and religious organisations than anything else.
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Alan H
Posts: 22015
Joined: July 3rd, 2007, 10:26 pm

Re: Britain Is A 'Christian Nation', apparently

#101 Postby Alan H » March 27th, 2016, 4:57 pm

Latest post of the previous page:

David 'call me Dave' Cameron's Easter message: Britain must defend its Christian values against terrorism, David Cameron say
Alan Henness

There are three fundamental questions for anyone advocating Brexit:

1. What, precisely, are the significant and tangible benefits of leaving the EU?
2. What damage to the UK and its citizens is an acceptable price to pay for those benefits?
3. Which ruling of the ECJ is most persuasive of the need to leave its jurisdiction?

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Dave B
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Joined: May 17th, 2010, 9:15 pm

Re: Britain Is A 'Christian Nation', apparently

#102 Postby Dave B » March 27th, 2016, 5:45 pm

Alan H wrote:David 'call me Dave' Cameron's Easter message: Britain must defend its Christian values against terrorism, David Cameron say

Usual stuff then, still just as biased as ever.
"Look forward; yesterday was a lesson, if you did not learn from it you wasted it."
Me, 2015

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Alan H
Posts: 22015
Joined: July 3rd, 2007, 10:26 pm

Re: Britain Is A 'Christian Nation', apparently

#103 Postby Alan H » May 23rd, 2016, 11:53 pm

Remind me again why Nicky Morgan is pushing yet more religion on children? People of no religion outnumber Christians in England and Wales – study
The number of people who say they have no religion is rapidly escalating and significantly outweighs the Christian population in England and Wales, according to new analysis.

The proportion of the population who identify as having no religion – referred to as “nones” – reached 48.5% in 2014, almost double the figure of 25% in the 2011 census. Those who define themselves as Christian – Anglicans, Catholics and other denominations – made up 43.8% of the population.

“The striking thing is the clear sense of the growth of ‘no religion’ as a proportion of the population,” said Stephen Bullivant, senior lecturer in theology and ethics at St Mary’s Catholic University in Twickenham, who analysed data collected through British Social Attitudes surveys over three decades.

“The main driver is people who were brought up with some religion now saying they have no religion. What we’re seeing is an acceleration in the numbers of people not only not practising their faith on a regular basis, but not even ticking the box. The reason for that is the big question in the sociology of religion.”

The report did not examine data from Scotland or Northern Ireland. Last month a Scottish Social Attitudes survey found that 52% of the population said they were not religious, compared with 40% in 1999.
Alan Henness

There are three fundamental questions for anyone advocating Brexit:

1. What, precisely, are the significant and tangible benefits of leaving the EU?
2. What damage to the UK and its citizens is an acceptable price to pay for those benefits?
3. Which ruling of the ECJ is most persuasive of the need to leave its jurisdiction?

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Alan H
Posts: 22015
Joined: July 3rd, 2007, 10:26 pm

Re: Britain Is A 'Christian Nation', apparently

#104 Postby Alan H » May 25th, 2016, 6:04 pm

Alan Henness

There are three fundamental questions for anyone advocating Brexit:

1. What, precisely, are the significant and tangible benefits of leaving the EU?
2. What damage to the UK and its citizens is an acceptable price to pay for those benefits?
3. Which ruling of the ECJ is most persuasive of the need to leave its jurisdiction?

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Alan H
Posts: 22015
Joined: July 3rd, 2007, 10:26 pm

Re: Britain Is A 'Christian Nation', apparently

#105 Postby Alan H » December 1st, 2016, 6:39 pm

BHA: Calls to ‘defend religious liberty’ are in fact special pleading for Christians’ rights to discriminate
A new report published by the think tank Respublica has called for the law to be amended to require employers to accommodate the religious beliefs of employees, even if that results in discrimination against others. However, the British Humanist Association (BHA) has rejected the suggestion as privileging the rights of religious people to discriminate over those of others.

The report highlights a series of cases, such as that of the Christian B&B owners who weren’t allowed to refuse accommodation to a same-sex couple, and that of the Christian registrar who wasn’t allowed to refuse to perform civil partnership ceremonies, all litigated under the Human Rights Act 1998, and uses them to argue that the Act has led to an ‘encroachment on religious liberty’. The report argues that the law should be changed, through the upcoming Bill of Rights, so that instead of making discrimination unlawful, instead there should be a duty on employers to ‘reasonably accommodate’ religious employees, where their beliefs clash with their ability to perform their jobs.

Paradoxically, at the same time, Conservative Christian Fellowship Patron Fiona Bruce MP has commented, in Prime Minister’s Questions, that ‘the legal rights of freedom of religion and freedom of speech to speak about one’s faith responsibly, respectfully and without fear are as strong today as ever’.

BHA Director of Public Affairs Pavan Dhaliwal commented, ‘The law, as it stands, provides equal protection to all employees and service users against discrimination on account of the beliefs of others. Just as Christians can’t refuse a gay couple accommodation in a public hotel, so a gay couple couldn’t do the same to Christians. Equally, the law prevents employers from discriminating against employees on account of their belief, where it is possible to accommodate those beliefs without disadvantaging or discriminating against others.

‘What calls in this context for “reasonable accommodation” actually amount to are calls for the only valid stop on an employee’s ability to discriminate being cost – even if this disadvantages their colleagues or their customers. Such a change in law would privilege some people’s religious beliefs over the rights of LGBT people, women, and those of different religions and beliefs. The law, as it stands, has the balance right.’
Alan Henness

There are three fundamental questions for anyone advocating Brexit:

1. What, precisely, are the significant and tangible benefits of leaving the EU?
2. What damage to the UK and its citizens is an acceptable price to pay for those benefits?
3. Which ruling of the ECJ is most persuasive of the need to leave its jurisdiction?

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Alan H
Posts: 22015
Joined: July 3rd, 2007, 10:26 pm

Re: Britain Is A 'Christian Nation', apparently

#106 Postby Alan H » December 14th, 2016, 12:10 pm

Time To Put The Christian Persecution Myth To Bed
The report’s findings give lie to the claim that Christians in Britain are treated unfairly in the workplace or in any way ‘persecuted’ for their beliefs. It does highlight a “lack of understanding of the law”, which has led to “misinterpretation and confusion”. Much of this confusion is down to the media’s willingness to sensationalise cases involving Christians, ignoring the facts for the sexier ‘persecution’ narrative.
Alan Henness

There are three fundamental questions for anyone advocating Brexit:

1. What, precisely, are the significant and tangible benefits of leaving the EU?
2. What damage to the UK and its citizens is an acceptable price to pay for those benefits?
3. Which ruling of the ECJ is most persuasive of the need to leave its jurisdiction?

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Alan H
Posts: 22015
Joined: July 3rd, 2007, 10:26 pm

Re: Britain Is A 'Christian Nation', apparently

#107 Postby Alan H » December 22nd, 2016, 10:18 am

Theresa May ‘welcomes’ Christian report on how to proselytise at work
PM plugs evangelical booklet on 'sharing the gospel'
Alan Henness

There are three fundamental questions for anyone advocating Brexit:

1. What, precisely, are the significant and tangible benefits of leaving the EU?
2. What damage to the UK and its citizens is an acceptable price to pay for those benefits?
3. Which ruling of the ECJ is most persuasive of the need to leave its jurisdiction?

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Alan H
Posts: 22015
Joined: July 3rd, 2007, 10:26 pm

Re: Britain Is A 'Christian Nation', apparently

#108 Postby Alan H » January 4th, 2017, 9:34 am

Norway's church and state to divorce after almost 500 years
The Church of Norway and the Norwegian government are set to go their separate ways at the beginning of 2017 after almost 500 years of being together.

On Jan. 1, 2017, the motion filed eight years ago to separate church and state in Norway will finally be formalized. After the year ends, the country's priests and bishops will no longer be considered the king's appointed government officials, and the Church of Norway will become merely an independent business instead of a state agency, The Local details.
Alan Henness

There are three fundamental questions for anyone advocating Brexit:

1. What, precisely, are the significant and tangible benefits of leaving the EU?
2. What damage to the UK and its citizens is an acceptable price to pay for those benefits?
3. Which ruling of the ECJ is most persuasive of the need to leave its jurisdiction?

User avatar
Alan H
Posts: 22015
Joined: July 3rd, 2007, 10:26 pm

Re: Britain Is A 'Christian Nation', apparently

#109 Postby Alan H » April 6th, 2017, 11:13 pm

And Ireland is making some progress: Ireland sees 73% increase in number of non-believers
Alan Henness

There are three fundamental questions for anyone advocating Brexit:

1. What, precisely, are the significant and tangible benefits of leaving the EU?
2. What damage to the UK and its citizens is an acceptable price to pay for those benefits?
3. Which ruling of the ECJ is most persuasive of the need to leave its jurisdiction?

User avatar
Alan H
Posts: 22015
Joined: July 3rd, 2007, 10:26 pm

Re: Britain Is A 'Christian Nation', apparently

#110 Postby Alan H » May 6th, 2017, 6:48 pm

Alan Henness

There are three fundamental questions for anyone advocating Brexit:

1. What, precisely, are the significant and tangible benefits of leaving the EU?
2. What damage to the UK and its citizens is an acceptable price to pay for those benefits?
3. Which ruling of the ECJ is most persuasive of the need to leave its jurisdiction?

User avatar
Alan H
Posts: 22015
Joined: July 3rd, 2007, 10:26 pm

Re: Britain Is A 'Christian Nation', apparently

#111 Postby Alan H » July 1st, 2017, 4:23 pm

Religious affiliation in Scotland 'declines sharply'
The Scottish Attitudes Survey, compiled by the independent research body ScotCen, found 58% of respondents said they had no religion at all.

When the survey was carried out in 1999, the figure was 40%.

Among major denominations, the Church of Scotland has seen the sharpest decline, with just 18% saying the belong to the Kirk.

The Church of Scotland figure for 1999 was 35%.

ScotCen researcher Ian Montagu said: "The decline in religious identity in Scotland has been most keenly felt by the Kirk as fewer and fewer people choose to describe themselves as Church of Scotland by default.
Alan Henness

There are three fundamental questions for anyone advocating Brexit:

1. What, precisely, are the significant and tangible benefits of leaving the EU?
2. What damage to the UK and its citizens is an acceptable price to pay for those benefits?
3. Which ruling of the ECJ is most persuasive of the need to leave its jurisdiction?

User avatar
Alan H
Posts: 22015
Joined: July 3rd, 2007, 10:26 pm

Re: Britain Is A 'Christian Nation', apparently

#112 Postby Alan H » September 4th, 2017, 5:51 pm

Latest British Social Attitudes reveals 71% of young adults are non-religious, just 3% are Church of England
September 4th, 2017

The latest findings of the British Social Attitudes Survey, published today, reveal 71% of 18-24 year olds say they belong to no religion, while just 3% say they are Church of England and 5% say they are Catholic. These latter two figures only increase slightly to 5% and 9%, respectively, amongst 25-34 year olds.

Overall, 53% of the population say they belong to no religion, 15% to the Church of England, 9% to the Catholic Church, 17% to other Christian denominations, and 6% to other religions.

Humanists UK has said the figures must raise fresh questions about the place of the churches in the running of state schools and their other state-funded privileges.

Humanists UK Chief Executive Andrew Copson asked, ‘How can it be right that 97% of young people today are not Anglicans, but some 20% of the state schools to which their children will go belong to the Church of England? More generally, how can the Church of England remain in any meaningful sense the national legally established church, when it caters for such a small portion of the population?’

As of last year, for the first time in history, the Church of England has more children in its state schools worshipping every weekday, than worshippers in its churches every week.

Mr Copson continued, ‘It is clear that the Church of England is experiencing ongoing and probably irreversible collapse in adherents. This should just be its private concern, but the fact that its response to this has been to seek ever more power and public money, even as the case for such state support evaporates, makes it a matter of public interest. It is long overdue that the Government woke up to the demographic reality of today’s Britain and recognises that ever-increasing state funding for religion, and public emphasis on the activities of religious groups, is the reverse of what the public wants.’

Image
Alan Henness

There are three fundamental questions for anyone advocating Brexit:

1. What, precisely, are the significant and tangible benefits of leaving the EU?
2. What damage to the UK and its citizens is an acceptable price to pay for those benefits?
3. Which ruling of the ECJ is most persuasive of the need to leave its jurisdiction?

User avatar
Alan H
Posts: 22015
Joined: July 3rd, 2007, 10:26 pm

Re: Britain Is A 'Christian Nation', apparently

#113 Postby Alan H » September 16th, 2017, 12:20 am

53% OF UK PEOPLE HAVE NO RELIGION (SKY NEWS)
The latest British Social Attitudes Survey has confirmed again what we have known to be true for some time now: Religion’s privileged position in society (especially that of the Church of England) simply doesn’t reflect the beliefs of the British people.

Last night I discussed the latest figures on Sky News…


Alan Henness

There are three fundamental questions for anyone advocating Brexit:

1. What, precisely, are the significant and tangible benefits of leaving the EU?
2. What damage to the UK and its citizens is an acceptable price to pay for those benefits?
3. Which ruling of the ECJ is most persuasive of the need to leave its jurisdiction?


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