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The future of education (if any)

For discussions related to education and educational institutions.
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Alan H
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Re: The future of education (if any)

#781 Postby Alan H » March 17th, 2017, 9:51 am

Latest post of the previous page:

Sound familiar at all? All schools 'to face funding gap by 2020'
Alan Henness

"We're all in this together, but some are more in it than others."
— Me, with apologies to Napoleon

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Alan H
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Re: The future of education (if any)

#782 Postby Alan H » March 20th, 2017, 7:12 pm

Presumably Deloitte will do it as long as it's profitable to them: New leadership development programme launched
A leadership development programme for Chief Executives of Multi Academy Trusts has been launched drawing on expertise from the Church of England, academia and the City.

The Church of England Foundation for Educational Leadership programme for Chief Executives of Multi-Academy Trusts will be delivered in partnership with UCL Institute of Education, working with Deloitte.

The programme has been shaped to draw on the Church of England's involvement in education over 200 years, to include UCL IOE's deep expertise across the education system, including academies and leadership, and to learn from Deloitte's business knowledge and practical experience of working in the education sector. There will be input from leading experts and practitioners from education as well as learning from wider sectors.
Alan Henness

"We're all in this together, but some are more in it than others."
— Me, with apologies to Napoleon

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Alan H
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Re: The future of education (if any)

#783 Postby Alan H » March 28th, 2017, 11:49 pm

Alan Henness

"We're all in this together, but some are more in it than others."
— Me, with apologies to Napoleon

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Alan H
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Re: The future of education (if any)

#784 Postby Alan H » April 10th, 2017, 2:12 pm

Alan Henness

"We're all in this together, but some are more in it than others."
— Me, with apologies to Napoleon

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Alan H
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Re: The future of education (if any)

#785 Postby Alan H » April 10th, 2017, 10:51 pm

Alan Henness

"We're all in this together, but some are more in it than others."
— Me, with apologies to Napoleon

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Alan H
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Re: The future of education (if any)

#786 Postby Alan H » April 12th, 2017, 1:11 am

And it continues... Grammar school among sponsors for 111 new free schools

Another batch of religious schools and now Grammar schools. It'll take generations to undo the damage this Tory Government is inflicting on society.
Alan Henness

"We're all in this together, but some are more in it than others."
— Me, with apologies to Napoleon

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coffee
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Re: The future of education (if any)

#787 Postby coffee » April 12th, 2017, 3:39 pm

I don't care what the government do, They can't detract from my written/printed values below, but for you it is a constant worry because you and the BHA would have nothing left to show because you & the BHA have little or no values left to fight for. Transmitting thought is a lot more difficult than transmitting values. That is why the religious number is less than that the nonreligious but they are occupy in the key positions and making all the key decisions about this country. Good luck with your battles.


http://www.restorativeempathy.com/Unive ... mpathy.pdf
http://www.restorativeempathy.com/Feeli ... mpathy.pdf

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Alan H
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Re: The future of education (if any)

#788 Postby Alan H » April 12th, 2017, 5:30 pm

coffee wrote:I don't care what the government do, They can't detract from my written/printed values below, but for you it is a constant worry because you and the BHA would have nothing left to show because you & the BHA have little or no values left to fight for. Transmitting thought is a lot more difficult than transmitting values. That is why the religious number is less than that the nonreligious but they are occupy in the key positions and making all the key decisions about this country. Good luck with your battles.


http://www.restorativeempathy.com/Unive ... mpathy.pdf
http://www.restorativeempathy.com/Feeli ... mpathy.pdf

Bizarre.
Alan Henness

"We're all in this together, but some are more in it than others."
— Me, with apologies to Napoleon

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coffee
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Re: The future of education (if any)

#789 Postby coffee » April 12th, 2017, 6:19 pm

What I mean is teaching people how to think critically is a lot more harder than pen to paper what values are you believe in, at the moment The BHA make it up as they go along which is harder to follow.

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Alan H
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Re: The future of education (if any)

#790 Postby Alan H » April 12th, 2017, 9:26 pm

coffee wrote:What I mean is teaching people how to think critically is a lot more harder than pen to paper what values are you believe in, at the moment The BHA make it up as they go along which is harder to follow.
What is it they are making up as they go along?
Alan Henness

"We're all in this together, but some are more in it than others."
— Me, with apologies to Napoleon

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coffee
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Re: The future of education (if any)

#791 Postby coffee » April 12th, 2017, 9:36 pm

It is lack or not enough values there that I like

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Alan H
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Re: The future of education (if any)

#792 Postby Alan H » April 13th, 2017, 12:12 am

coffee wrote:It is lack or not enough values there that I like
My question was what they were making up as they went along. The fact that you think they lack values or don't have enough of them doesn't answer my question.
Alan Henness

"We're all in this together, but some are more in it than others."
— Me, with apologies to Napoleon

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Alan H
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Re: The future of education (if any)

#793 Postby Alan H » April 13th, 2017, 1:03 pm

Alan Henness

"We're all in this together, but some are more in it than others."
— Me, with apologies to Napoleon

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Alan H
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Re: The future of education (if any)

#794 Postby Alan H » April 13th, 2017, 6:20 pm

Alan Henness

"We're all in this together, but some are more in it than others."
— Me, with apologies to Napoleon

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Alan H
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Re: The future of education (if any)

#795 Postby Alan H » April 17th, 2017, 12:14 am

Revealed: how free schools boom helps England’s richest regions
Theresa May’s education policies came under fresh attack on Saturday night amid evidence that the Tories’ flagship “free schools” programme wastes huge sums of public money while benefiting prosperous areas in the south far more than deprived places elsewhere.

With the prime minister already facing cross-party criticism over plans to open more grammar schools, ministers were confronted with data showing that new free schools in England will fail to meet urgent demand for new places, and cost taxpayers vast amounts of money when they fail to get off the ground.

In a further sign of unease, former schools minister David Laws, writing in Sunday’s Observer, called on May’s government to drop plans for more grammars from the next Queen’s speech because they are likely to “make our country a more unequal place”.

Shadow education secretary Angela Rayner said analysis of data about the 111 new free schools announced last week showed that the 20 most deprived areas of the country would get just 12 new schools, with the 20 least deprived areas seeing 18 new free schools. Labour said that government figures showed the new schools meeting 50% of the requirement for new places in the south-east, and just 2% in the north-east.


It’s time for Theresa May to ditch grammar school plans
It is one of the worst kept secrets in Westminster that education secretary Justine Greening is not the biggest supporter of the policy that is now the social mobility “flagship” of Theresa May’s government – expanding the number of grammar schools.

Greening must be aware of the clear UK and international evidence that selective education both fails to raise overall standards, and undermines the prospects of poor children. Education Policy Institute researchers last year analysed the government’s own schools data and drew two key conclusions. First, that almost no children on free school meals get into grammar schools – a risible 4,000 out of more than eight million pupils in the whole of England. Second, that although there is a small benefit for pupils who are admitted to selective schools, this is offset by the worse results for other pupils in areas with a significant number of grammar places.

Greening is nevertheless doing her best to support the prime minister’s ill-judged policy. Last week she made a speech in which she sought to divert attention away from the poorest quarter of children, to a so-called “ordinary working families” group (previously JAMs – Just About Managing). This more affluent group, argued Greening, does far better in securing access to grammar schools. The education secretary is quite right – but only because these children are already doing better at school.

But if these OWFs are doing relatively well, why is the government talking so much about them? It is the poorest quarter of children who really lag behind. Two-thirds of these poorest children already fail to secure the modest benchmark of five C grade GCSEs, including English and maths. That “failure” rate will rocket to 80% when the new, more challenging GCSE standard is introduced this year, so it makes no sense educationally to move the emphasis away from these poor children. So what is driving this new government narrative? It is tempting to conclude politics, not education.

The poorest children are very unlikely to gain from any solution involving a selection test at age 11. By then, 60% of the disadvantaged gap has already emerged – meaning these children are on average 10 months of learning behind their peers. To give these children a chance, the government needs to improve the quality of early years education, increase the number of excellent primary schools in poor areas, attract and develop more high quality teachers, and protect pupil premium funding from the coming budget squeeze.

Nor are quotas likely to be the answer. They would be highly controversial, and to make a material difference they would require grammars to admit poor pupils of much lower performance. Do we really want classes of lower-attaining, predominantly poor children taught in a segregated stream?

Greening is loyally trying to make the best of a policy that all the evidence suggests should be buried. Scarce time spent trying to make the unworkable work is diverting her from the important efforts she is making to improve teacher training and target the areas of greatest need.

Education policy should be driven by evidence. It is surely now sensible for Downing Street to drop the grammar plans from the Queen’s speech. If not, Greening, who could be a rather good education secretary, will waste her time and talents on a policy which is likely to make our country a more unequal place.

David Laws was schools minister from 2012 to 2015 and is executive chairman of the Education Policy Institute
Alan Henness

"We're all in this together, but some are more in it than others."
— Me, with apologies to Napoleon

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Alan H
Posts: 20905
Joined: July 3rd, 2007, 10:26 pm

Re: The future of education (if any)

#796 Postby Alan H » April 24th, 2017, 11:29 am

Alan Henness

"We're all in this together, but some are more in it than others."
— Me, with apologies to Napoleon


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